How Important is Publication at the Appellate Court for Getting Supreme Court Review in a Civil Case?

Yesterday, we showed that the Supreme Court regularly reviews roughly three civil cases which were unanimous decisions at the Appellate Court for every decision which had a dissenter below.  Today, we’re looking at a similar question – how often does the Court review unpublished decisions?

Between 1990 and 1995, the share of published cases below on the Court’s civil docket was generally in the low eighty percent range.  But in 1996, it fell to 61.82%.  In the following years, the published share was 60.32% (1997), 66.2% (1998) and 73.17% (1999).

The published decisions’ share of the civil docket edged up a bit from 2000 to 2009.  In 2001, only 56.86% of the civil docket had been published below.  But that share rose to 72% (2002), 80.43% (2003), 74.07% (2004), 68.75% (2005), 87.76% (2006), 70.73% (2007), 95.24% (2008) and 80.49% (2009).

The published share of the docket remained quite high from 2010 to 2013 – 87.88% (2010), 94.74% (2011), 85% (2012) and 91.18% (2013), before falling back closer to its long-term trend.  In 2014, only 55.56% of the civil cases were published below.  In 2015, that rose to 79.55%.  The following year, it was 67.86%.  In 2017, 92.31% of the civil cases were published below, but in 2018 and so far in 2019, the share was down to 77.27%.

In our final table, we report all the data for the thirty years together.  What we see is that the share of published cases on the civil docket seems to have increased a bit across the past two decades.  From 1990 to about 2006, the civil docket’s share of published cases from the Appellate Court tended to be somewhere between sixty and eighty percent.  From 2006 to 2013, the share increased, generally to between eighty and ninety-five percent.  The share dropped sharply in 2014 to 55.56%, but across the past three years, there is some inclination that it may be returning to something like the 2006-2013 level.  So the bottom line is that while anywhere from ten to thirty percent of the Supreme Court’s civil decisions each year were unpublished at the Appellate Court, it’s true that publication is enormously helpful to getting review.

Join us back here next Tuesday as we turn our attention to a new topic.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Bill Taroli (no changes).

How Important is a Dissent at the Appellate Court for Getting Supreme Court Review in a Civil Case?

One often hears that in order to successfully petition for leave to appeal to the Supreme Court, a dissenter at the Appellate Court is crucial.  But is it true?  Today, we’re reviewing the Court’s civil docket.  In order to look at the data across the entire thirty years, we calculate the percentage of civil cases each year where there was a dissenter below.

Between 1990 and 1999, only about one in every four civil cases which the Supreme Court decided had had a dissenter at the Appellate Court.  The numbers were relatively close from 1990 to 1996: 23.6% (1990), 28.3% (1991), 22.83% (1992), 21.05% (1993), 28% (1994), 26.79% (1995) and 21.82% (1996).  Only 9.52% of the civil cases decided in 1997 had a dissenter below.  The number rose a bit to 15.49% in 1998 and even further in 1999, to 36.59%.

In 2000, 21.05% of civil cases had a dissenter below.  The number dropped in 2001 to only 7.84% before rising to 28% in 2002 and 36.96% in 2003.  In 2004, 18.52% of civil cases had a dissenter below.  In 2005, it was 22.92%, and in 2006, it was 24.49%.  In 2007, 36.59% of civil cases had a dissenter below.  The number fell a bit in 2008, to 30.95%, and a bit more in 2009, to 24.39%.

In 2010, 36.36% of civil cases had a dissenter below.  The following year, it fell to 26.32%.  In 2012, 30% of civil cases had a dissenter below.  In 2013, 29.41% of civil cases had a dissenter.  In 2014, the share fell to only 14.81% before rising to 34.09% in 2015, falling to 17.86% in 2016 and rising back to 38.46% in 2017.  In 2018, 22.73% of civil cases had a dissenter below.  So far in 2019, 18.18% of civil cases have had a dissenter below.

In Table 1356, we review the entire thirty years on a single graph.  We see here that although the percentage of cases with dissenters is seldom stable from one year to the next, at least since the mid-1990s, the numbers are clustered around a consistent mean of between 25% and 30%.  So the conclusion is clear: although a dissenter at the Appellate Court might help a petition for leave to appeal to stand out at the Appellate Court, the Court regularly decides roughly three civil cases which were unanimous decisions at the Appellate Court for every one which had a dissenter below.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the share of civil cases which were published below.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Ron Frazier (no changes).

How Often Have the Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Districts Been Reversed in Criminal Cases, and How Often Are Direct Appeals from Trial Court Judgments Reversed?

Last time, we reviewed the 3-year floating average reversal rates in criminal cases for the Divisions of the First District.  In this post, we’re looking at the data for the rest of the state: the Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Districts of the Appellate Court, and direct appeals from trial court judgments.

Between 1992 and 2000, the Second and Fifth Districts remained, for the most part, around the long-term trend reversal rate of 40-55%.  The Third District was a bit high – 69.57% in 1992, two-thirds reversal in 1993, 74.36% in 1994, 83.33% in 1998, 81.82% in 1999 and two-thirds in 2000.  The Fourth District started in the middle but was on the high side for the last four years of the period: 73.33% (1997), 64.29% (1998), 76.47% (1999) and 73.33% (2000).  The reversal rate for direct appeals was almost entirely unchanged across the nine years, nearly always between 40 and 45%.

Between 2001 and 2009, the reversal rate for the Second District rose from one-third in 2001 to the high fifties and sixties by the end of the period.  The Third District’s criminal reversal rate was in the fifties and sixties each year before finishing the period at 72.73% in 2008 and 70% in 2009.  The Fourth District’s reversal rate fell each year from 2001 (80.77%) to 2005 (44.44%).  Aside from a one-year dip to 30% in 2007, the rate stayed in the middle forties for several years before hitting 50% in 2009.  The Fifth District reversal rate was at 50% in 2003, 2004 and 2008, 55.56% in 2006, and two-thirds in 2005 and 2007.  The reversal rate for direct appeals was relatively low from 2001 (35.16%) to 2005 (39.02%), but then rose to 63.64% in 2006.  By 2009, the reversal rate for direct appeals was 45.45%.

Between 2010 and 2019, the Second District’s criminal reversal rate has varied quite a bit, from 38.46% in 2013 and 30.77% in 2014 to the mid-sixties in 2016, 2018 and 2019 and 87.5% in 2017.  Nevertheless, the numbers across the entire ten-year period compute to a median very close to its thirty-year average.  The Third District’s reversal rate was in the low-to-mid sixties for the most part from 2010 to 2016 (with the exception of a small jump to 75% in 2013), before dropping into the fifties for 2017, 2018 and 2019.  The Fourth District’s reversal rate was low for the most part from 2010 to 2016, but has jumped recently to 72.73% in 2017, 66.67% in 2018 and 72.73% in 2019.  The Fifth District’s reversal rate in criminal cases has been high in recent years: 100% in each year from 2010 to 2013, 83.33% in 2014, 75% in 2015, 72.73% in 2016, 66.67% in 2017, 71.43% in 2018 and 66.67% in 2019.  Direct appeals from the trial courts were faring well from 2010 to 2012 with reversal rates of 40%, 50% and 42.86%, respectively, but have been higher since: 75% (2015), 73.33% (2016), 92.31% (2017), 90.91% (2018) and 62.5% (2019).

In our final Table, we report the overall reversal rate for each District and Division for the entire period thirty-year period.  Unattributed cases from the First District were reversed 45.45% of the time.  Divisions One through Five of the First District had reversal rates in the mid-fifties – 56.25% (Division One), 54.35% (Division Two), 56.72% (Division Three), 56.82% (Division Four), and 50% (Division Five).  Division Six had a reversal rate of 46.34%.  The Second District’s overall reversal rate is 53.23%.  The Third District’s reversal rate is 63.83%.  Both the Fourth and Fifth Districts were in the mid-fifties – 56.52% (Fourth District) and 55.84% (Fifth District).  Direct appeals from the trial courts were reversed in 41.68% of cases.

Join us back here next week as we turn our attention to a new topic.                          

Image courtesy of Flickr by Gary Todd (no changes).

How Often Has the First District Been Reversed in Criminal Cases, 1990-2019?

This week, we’re looking at the reversal rate data for the criminal side of the docket.  Once again, we’re using three-year floating average to tamp down wild swings in the data from year to year (at least a bit), and to avoid needless complexity in the math, we count a case as a reversal when the decision below was affirmed in part and reversed in part.  In the first Table, we report the reversal rates for the years 1992 to 2000.

Three Divisions reached 100% reversal during these years: Division One in 1996, Division Four in 1996 and 2000, and Division Six in 1999.  But these were outlier years for the most part.  Division One was in the forty-to-sixty range from 1992 to 1995 and dropped to 33.33% in 1997 and 2000 and zero in 1998 and 1999.  Division Three’s reversal rate was in the eighties in 1992 and 1996 and in the sixties 1993-1995 and 1997 before tailing off at the end of the decade.  Division Six had a reversal rate of 50% in 1993 and 1994, 33.33% in 1995 and 1998, and only 25% in 1996 and 1997.

Reversal rates were somewhat less stable between 2001 and 2009.  Division One rose to 100% in 2003 and 2007.  Division Two was at 100% every year from 2001 to 2004 before falling steadily for the rest of the decade.  Division Three was at the long-term overall trend level of 45-65% reversal for most of the period before rising a bit 2007-2009.  Divisions Four and Five both had outlier years where their reversal rate jumped to 100% – Division Four in 2001 and 2002 and Division Five in 2004 and 2005.  Division Six was up to 100% in 2003 but dropped to zero only two years later.

In our final table, we report the 3-year floating average reversal rates for the years 2010 through 2019.  For the most part, the First District has been doing relatively well in criminal cases during these years, with reversal rates for the most part at or below the long-term average.  The only real exception to this is Division One, which has had a higher rate recently: 80% (2013), 100% (2014 & 2015), 66.67% (2016 & 2017) 70% (2018) and 100% (2019).

Join us back here next time as we address the reversal rates for the rest of the Districts, plus direct criminal appeals from the trial courts.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Russ Amptmeyer (no changes).

How Often Have the Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Districts of the Appellate Court Been Reversed in Civil Cases, 1990-2019?

In Table 1342 below, we report the three-year floating average reversal rates for the Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Appellate Districts for the years 1992 to 1999.  The Second District fared best during these years.  The Third and Fourth were relatively equal, and the Fifth District fared worst.

The Second District had only one spike, to a reversal rate of 73.68% in 1995.  The Third District began at 76.19% in 1993 but was otherwise between half and two-thirds.  The Fourth District had a reversal rate of 73.08% in 1992 and 73.68% in 1997.  The Fifth District was at 80.95% in 1999, 80.65% in 1992, and in the seventies for 1993, 1996, 1997 and 1998. \

The years 2000 to 2009 were similar.  The Second District reached a high of 70% reversal in 2004.  The Third District was quite low throughout the decade – 28.57% in 2001, 25% in 2002, 33.33% in 2006 and 35.71% in 2007.  The Fourth District was just slightly higher, with its reversal rate in the forties and fifties each year.  The Fifth District remained the highest reversal rate in the state: 81.25% in 2001, 75% in 2002 and 2003, 70.59% in 2007 and 90.91% in 2009.

The Fourth District has fared quite well between 2010 and 2019.  The Second District was fairly high for the first five years of the decade and lower since; the Third District was the reverse.  The Second reached a reversal rate of 76.47% in 2014 before dropping to 30.77% in 2017 and 42.86% in 2018.  The Third District was in the fifties from 2011 to 2014 but reached 71.43% in 2016, 70% in 2017 and 2018 and two-thirds so far in 2019.  The Fourth District was very low throughout: 30% in 2012, 2016 and 2017, 50% in 2018 and only 44.44% in 2019.  The Fifth District reversal rate was very high for the first half of the decade, but has improved considerably since: 92.31% (2010); 85.71% (2011); 78.57% (2012); 81.82% (2013); 90.91% (2014) and 90% (2015), then 64.29% (2016); 58.33% (2017) and 37.5% (2018) and two-thirds so far this year.

In our final table, we report the overall reversal rate of each Division and District for the years 1990 to 2019.  The Divisions of the First District and the Second, Third and Fourth Districts have all been quite close: 54.22% for 1.1; 60.98% for 1.2; 60.75% for 1.3; 51.16% for 1.4; 58.82% for 1.5; 55.7% for 1.6; 54.37% for the 2nd, 57.26% for the Third and 54.82% for the Fourth.  The thirty-year civil reversal rate for the Fifth District is 73.3%.

Next week, we’ll review the data on the criminal side of the docket.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Roger W (no changes).

How Often Have the Divisions of the First District Been Reversed in Civil Cases, 1990-2019?

For the past several weeks, we’ve been reviewing the county by county data for civil and criminal cases at the Supreme Court.  This week and next, we’ll be looking at the reversal rates for the Districts and Divisions of the Appellate Court.  First up today – Chicago’s First District.  Since it’s difficult occasionally to confirm which Division of the First District a case arose from, we divide the data into seven courts – Divisions One through Six and a catch-all for unallocated First District cases.   Because individual Divisions typically have no more than 2-4 cases decided by the Court in any given year, we use three- year floating average reversal rates – thus, the numbers reported below as “1992” are the combined reversal rate for the years 1990, 1991 and 1992.  We then drop the 1990 data and add 1993 to report the next year (and so on).

As reported in Table 1339, reversal rates in the First District tended to cluster around the 50-60% mark through most of the 90s.  Divisions 1, 2, 3 and 5 all had spikes, as did the unallocated First District cases.  Division 1 hit 80% reversal in 1993; Division 2 reached 75% in 1996; Division 3 reached 81.25% in 1996 and Division 5 was at 100% in 1997.  The unallocated cases were reversed at an 87.5% clip in 1996.  Only Divisions 4 and 6 were consistent across the period, seldom dipping or spiking.  Unallocated cases were at 22.22% in 1993 and 33.33% in 1994.  Division 1 was at 30% in 1999.  Division 3 was at 36.36% in 1999.  The reversal rate of Division 4 was 37.5% in 1997.

The three-year floating averages were a bit more consistent from 2000 to 2009.  Division 1 had a three- year dip from 2007 to 2009 – 28.57% (2007), 12.5% (2008) and 25% (2009).  Division 2 fell to 28.57% in 2004 and one-third for the next two years.  Division 4 rose to 83.33% in 2004 and 80% the following year.  Division 5 was 80% in 2007 and 75% in the following year.  Division 6 dipped to 16.67% in 2006 and 27.27% in 2007.

The reversal rates became a bit more unstable over the past decade.  Division 1’s rate was at only 27.27% in 2010 before jumping to 100% in 2013 and 2014.  Division 2’s reversal rate was quite high early in the decade: 83.33% in 2010, 80% in 2011, 90% in 2012 and 2013, 100% in 2014 and 80% in 2014.  Division 3 was quite high at the beginning and end of the decade: 87.5% in 2010, 80% in 2018 and 2019.  Division 4 has fared well in the past decade for the most part – 33.33% in 2010 and 2019, 25% in 2011 and 30% in 2012.  Division 4’s highest rate was 71.43% in 2014.  Division 5’s reversal rate was 80% in 2011 and 2012 before falling to one-third in 2014 and 28.57% in 2015.  Division 6’s reversal rate reached 76.92% in 2012, 72.73% in 2014, 75% in 2015 and 80% in 2016.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the data for the Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Districts.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Adam Jones (no changes).

What Kinds of Criminal Cases Did Cook County Send to the Supreme Court, 2005-2019?

Yesterday, we reviewed the areas of law involved in the criminal cases from Cook county – the only county in the First Appellate District – from 1990 to 2004.  Today, we’re reviewing the numbers for the years 2005 to 2019.

The Court decided seven criminal procedure cases from Cook county in 2005, three cases each in constitutional law, habeas and juvenile issues, two cases involving sexual offenses and one involving violent crimes.  In 2006, the Court decided nine criminal procedure cases, seven on constitutional law, and one case each in habeas corpus, juvenile issues, sentencing and violent crimes.  In 2007, the Court decided five cases in constitutional law, four in criminal procedure and habeas corpus, and one each involving the death penalty and sentencing law.  In 2008, the Court decided seven constitutional law cases, four each in criminal procedure and sentencing, two about juvenile law issues, and one each regarding the death penalty and habeas corpus.  In 2009, the Court decided sixteen criminal procedure cases from Cook county, three cases involving constitutional law, two involving habeas corpus and sentencing law and one each involving sexual offenses, juvenile law issues and the death penalty.

The Supreme Court decided nine criminal procedure cases from Cook county in 2010, six habeas corpus cases, two each in constitutional law and sentencing, and one each involving the death penalty, juvenile issues and political offenses.  In 2011, the Court decided nine sentencing cases, eight criminal procedure cases, three cases each about property crimes and violent crimes, two habeas corpus cases and one case involving sexual offenses.  In 2012, the Court decided four constitutional law cases, three criminal procedure cases and two cases each in habeas corpus, sexual offenses and violent crimes.  In 2013, the Court decided eight criminal procedure cases, five constitutional law cases, three habeas cases, two sentencing cases and one case each relating to drug offenses, juvenile issues and property crimes.  In 2014, there were three constitutional law cases, two cases each in criminal procedure, habeas and sexual offenses, and one each involving juvenile issues and mental health issues.

The Court decided seven constitutional law cases in 2015, three criminal procedure, two sentencing, two involving violent crimes, and one each involving habeas corpus and juvenile issues.  The following year, the Court decided five criminal procedure cases, three cases involving habeas corpus and sentencing, two involving constitutional law and violent crimes, and one involving juvenile issues.  In 2017, the Court decided seven constitutional law cases, four involving juvenile issues, three in criminal procedure and one each involving drug offenses, mental health issues and property crimes.  In 2018, the Court decided three criminal procedure cases and one case each in constitutional law, sentencing and violent crimes.  In 2019, the Court has decided two constitutional law cases from Cook county.

Finally, we review what share of the total criminal docket from 1990 to 2019 (to date) was accounted for by each area of law.  Four areas are in double digits: criminal procedure (22.27%), constitutional law (21.81%), the death penalty (17.29%) and habeas corpus (15.73%).  Following those areas were sentencing (7.94%), juvenile issues (5.14%) and violent crimes (4.83%).

Join us back here next week as we turn our attention to a new issue in our examination of the Court’s decision making.

Image courtesy of Flickr by David Wilson (no changes).

What Kinds of Criminal Cases Did Cook County Send to the Supreme Court, 1990-2004?

Last week, we reviewed the areas of law involved in the Supreme Court’s Cook county civil cases.  Today and tomorrow, we’re reviewing the criminal data.

In 1990, the Court decided a dozen death penalty cases from Cook county, six constitutional and six criminal procedure cases, one habeas corpus case and one involving property crimes (e.g., burglary, theft, embezzlement, etc.).  In 1991, the Court decided nine criminal procedure cases, seven death penalty cases, two cases each in constitutional law and habeas corpus, and one each regarding juvenile issues, sexual offenses and violent crimes.  In 1992, the Court decided thirteen death penalty cases, seven constitutional law cases, six sentencing cases, five cases each in habeas corpus and violent crimes, four regarding criminal procedure and one involving driving offenses.  In 1993, there were nine death penalty cases, six constitutional law cases, three cases in criminal procedure, and one each involving driving offenses and juvenile issues.  In 1994, the Court decided nine cases each in constitutional law and death penalty law, five involving criminal procedure, three about habeas corpus, and one each involving sentencing and violent crimes.

The Court decided nine death penalty cases from Cook county in 1995.  The Court decided seven cases each in constitutional law and habeas, five involving violent crimes, three on criminal procedure, two on juvenile issues and one involving drug offenses.  In 1996, the Court decided ten death penalty cases, three on habeas, two each on constitutional law, criminal procedure, sentencing and violent crimes, and one each involving drug offenses and juvenile issues.  In 1997, the Court decided six cases each on the death penalty and habeas corpus, four on criminal procedure, three each on constitutional law and sentencing, two involving juvenile issues and one about violent crimes.  The following year, the Court decided a dozen death penalty cases from Cook county, six cases each on constitutional law and habeas corpus, two cases on sentencing law and one each on criminal procedure and violent crimes.  In 1999, the Court decided five cases in criminal procedure and habeas, four involving the death penalty, three on constitutional law and one each on property crimes and sentencing law.

The Court decided sixteen habeas cases from Cook County in 2000, nine death penalty cases, three constitutional law cases, two each in criminal procedure and juvenile issues and one apiece relating to property crimes, sentencing law and violent crimes.  In 2001, there were four cases on habeas corpus, three each in constitutional law and death penalty law, two about criminal procedure and sentencing law and one about juvenile issues.  In 2002, the Court decided nine habeas cases, six in criminal procedure, four about constitutional law, three about juvenile issues, two sentencing law cases and one each involving a death penalty and sexual offenses.  In 2003, the Court decided fifteen constitutional law cases, five in criminal procedure, two involving the death penalty and one each in habeas corpus, juvenile issues, sentencing law, sexual offenses and violent crimes.  In 2004, the Court decided six constitutional law cases, three each in habeas corpus and juvenile issues, two in criminal procedure and mental health issues and one in sentencing and violent crimes.

Join us back here tomorrow as we address the data for the years 2005 to 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Ken Lund (no changes).

What Kinds of Civil Cases Did Cook County Send to the Supreme Court, 2005-2019?

Last time, we reviewed the data on which areas of law were involved in the civil cases originating in Cook County which the Supreme Court decided from 1990 to 2004.  This time, we’re looking at the years 2005 to 2019.

In 2005, the Supreme Court decided five constitutional law and five government/administrative law cases which originated in Cook County.  There were four civil procedure cases, three tort and workers comp cases, two cases each in insurance law and tax law and one involving consumer law.  In 2006, the Court decided six tort cases, four government/administrative law cases, three constitutional and insurance law cases, two cases involving commercial law and one each in civil procedure, employment law and workers comp.  In 2007, the Court decided six tort cases, three civil procedure cases, two cases each in constitutional law, insurance law and workers compensation and one apiece in consumer and tax law.  In 2008, the Court decided nine tort cases, two tax law cases and one case each in five areas: civil procedure, constitutional law, contract law, election law and property law.  In 2009, the Court decided two cases each in four areas: constitutional law, government/administrative law, tax law and wills & estates.  The Court decided one case each in civil procedure, election law, employment law, insurance law and tort law.

In 2010, the Court decided five civil cases from Cook county in constitutional law and tort law, two each about civil procedure, government and administrative law, insurance and tax law, and one dealing with contract law, domestic relations, election law and secured transactions.  In 2011, there were three cases in domestic relations, government/administrative and tort law, and one apiece in civil procedure, constitutional law, election law, employment law, insurance and tax law.  In 2012, there were seven civil procedure cases, four in government and administrative law, three about tort law, two in domestic relations and one each in constitutional law, election law and wills & estates.  In 2013, the Court decided four cases involving government and administrative law, three in tort law, two in constitutional law and one each in civil procedure, tax, wills and estates and workers comp.  In 2014, there were four tort cases, three in government/administrative law, two about constitutional law and one each in civil procedure and domestic relations.

In 2015, the Court decided four tort cases, three civil procedure cases, two in constitutional law and government/administrative, and one each in six different areas: domestic relations, environmental law, insurance law, property law, secured transactions and workers compensation.  In 2016, the Court decided five civil constitutional law cases, four government, four tort and one each in domestic relations, property law and workers compensation.  In 2017, the Court decided five government cases, four tort, two constitutional law and one each in domestic relations and tax law.  Last year, there were four civil procedure cases, three in government and administrative law, two each about constitutional law and insurance law and one each in construction law and tort law.  So far in 2019, there have been two cases each in civil procedure, constitutional law and government/administrative and one each in property law and tax law.

Below we report the share of the total civil cases from Cook county for each area of the law.  Only four areas are in double digits – tort 27.02%, civil procedure 15.86%, constitutional law 14.4% and government and administrative law 12.78%.  After that, there’s a steep drop off to insurance law at 6.47%, domestic relations 3.4% and workers comp 3.24%.

Join us here next week as we look at Cook’s criminal cases decided by the Supreme Court.

Image courtesy of Flickr by HystericalMark (no changes).

What Kinds of Cases Did Cook County Send to the Supreme Court, 1990-2004?

Last week, we reviewed the data on which counties accounted for the Supreme Court’s death penalty cases between 1990 and the final case before abolition in 2010.  This week, we’re looking at the Cook county docket – what areas of law did the Cook county cases fall in?

In 1990, the Court decided ten tort cases from Cook county, ten civil procedure cases, five constitutional law cases, three commercial law and government/administrative law cases and one case each in contract law, domestic relations, election law, insurance law and workers compensation.  IN 1991, the Court decided eight tort law cases, three civil procedure cases, two cases each in constitutional law, contract and insurance law, and one case each in arbitration, commercial law, corporate law, domestic relations and wills and estates.  In 1992, the Court decided nine cases in tort law, six in constitutional and government law, five in civil procedure, three in insurance law, two in consumer law and one each in arbitration, commercial law, election law and employment law.  In 1993, the Court decided six tort cases, five civil procedure cases, three insurance law cases, two constitutional law cases and one case each in commercial law, insurance law, wills and estates and workers compensation.  In 1994, the Court decided eight cases each in civil procedure and tort law, six cases in constitutional law, three in government law, two each in domestic relations, insurance law and tax law and one property law case.

In 1995, the Court decided nine tort cases, seven civil procedure cases, two insurance and workers compensation cases and one case each in contract law, environmental law, government law, property law and wills and estates.  In 1996, the Court decided nine tort law cases, seven constitutional law cases and one case each in civil procedure, commercial law, contract law, domestic relations, employment law, property law and tax law.  In 1997, the Court decided a dozen tort cases, six civil procedure cases, five insurance law cases, two constitutional law cases and one case each in arbitration, commercial law, contract law, employment law, government law and property law.  In 1998, the Court decided ten tort cases, five civil procedure cases, four constitutional law cases, two cases in arbitration, employment law, government law and workers compensation.  Finally, the Court decided one contract law case and one tax law case.  In 1999, the Court decided six tor cases, three constitutional law cases, two cases each in civil procedure, government law and workers compensation and one each in employment law, insurance, property law and wills & estates.

In 2000, the Court decided four cases each in civil procedure and tort law, three in government law, two in insurance law and one case each in constitutional law, contract law, domestic relations, property law, tax and workers comp.  In 2001, the Court decided seven civil procedure cases from Cook county, four in constitutional law, three each in property law and tort, two each in employment law and insurance law and one case in arbitration, consumer law and government law.  In 2002, the Court decided six tort cases from Cook county, five government/administrative law cases, three civil procedure, two constitutional law and one case each in domestic relations, employment relations, insurance law, property law, wills and estates and workers compensation.  In 2003, the Court decided four con law cases, three each in domestic relations, government law, insurance and tort and one secured transactions case.  In 2004, the Court decided eight tort cases, four constitutional law cases, three government law cases, two in arbitration and contract law and one case each in civil procedure, domestic relations, insurance law and workers comp.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the Court’s Cook county civil cases for the years 2005 to 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Prayitno (no changes).

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