With this post, we’re reviewing the distribution of civil cases from the Third District for the years 1990 through 1999.  First, let’s look at the population distribution.

As of the 2000 census, the Third District was large geographically – encompassing fifteen counties – but small by population (only half the Second District).  Will County accounted for 34.38% of the Third District’s population.  Peoria had 12.55% and Rock Island was 10.22%, but all the other counties were below ten percent (led by Tazewell at 8.79%, LaSalle at 7.63% and Kankakee county at 7.11%).

We commented yesterday that there’s no particular reason to expect caseloads to track the population distribution all that closely, and the Third District numbers illustrate that.  Will County is a third of the Third’s population, but produced only five cases during the nineties.  Peoria County had 15 cases and LaSalle County had seven.  Rock Island accounted for four cases and Tazewell had three.

Tomorrow, we’ll review the data for the Fourth District.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Ron Frazier (no changes).

 

Today we begin a new series, looking at the geographic origins of the Supreme Court’s civil docket from the Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Districts of the Appellate Court.  (If you’re wondering why we’re not addressing the First District, there’s only one county in the District, so it would make for a short post.)

Of course, there’s no particularly compelling reason why the Court’s civil cases from a particular District should be spread out geographically in a way comparable to the population.  Nevertheless, we begin by noting the population of the Second District according to the 2000 census.  DuPage County was the biggest in the District with 32.78% of the total population (of the District, not the state).  Lake County had another 23.36% of the population, Kane was at 14.65% and Winnebago had 10.1%.  McHenry had 9.43% of the population, and the rest of the counties were quite small.

Turning to the case numbers, DuPage was the only county which had civil cases on the Supreme Court’s docket every year of the nineties.  Lake was close behind, being zeroed out only in 1993.  The Court decided 31 civil cases which originated in DuPage County and twenty from Lake County.  Kane was next, but accounted for only eight cases.  McHenry and Winnebago had five cases, DeKalb and Ogle counties had two each, and Boone, Stephenson and Lee only produced one case apiece.

Join us back here next time as we review the numbers for the Third District.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Michael (no changes).

Today, we’re completing our trip through the reversal rates for the Districts of the Appellate Court, divided by areas of civil law.  For this final post, we’re looking at the Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Districts for the years 2010 through 2019.

The overall reversal rate for these districts was 100% in employment law, property law, contract, arbitration and surety law cases.  Three-quarters of tax decisions were reversed.  The rate was two-thirds in workers compensation and secured transactions cases and 62.5% in constitutional law decisions.  The reversal rate for tort cases was 61.1%.  Half of all decisions were reversed in wills and estates, civil procedure, insurance, commercial law and election law.  The reversal rate for government and administrative cases and domestic relations cases was 33.3%.  The reversal rate for environmental law was 0%.

The Fourth and Fifth Districts had 100% reversal rates in constitutional law.  The rate for the Second District was 50% and the rate for the Third District was zero.  The reversal rate for tort cases from the Fifth District was 100%.  The rate for the Third District was 80%.  The rate for the Fourth was 66.7%.  Only 16.7% of tort decisions from the Second District were reversed.  Reversal rates for civil procedure cases were all over the map – 100% for the Third District, 75% for the Second, 50% for the Fifth District and zero for the Fourth.  For insurance law cases, the Third District reversal rate was 100%.  The rate for the Fourth and Fifth Districts was 50%, and the rate for the Second District was zero.  For government and administrative law cases, reversal rates were uniformly low: 44.4% in the Fourth District, 33.3% for the Second, 25% for the Third and 20% for the Fifth.  For domestic relations cases, the reversal rate for Second District cases was 50%.  The rate for the Third District was 33.3% and the rate for Fourth District cases was 20%.

Join us back here next time as we begin working on a new topic.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Matt Turner (no changes).

For the final phase of our review, we’re looking at the reversal rate at the Supreme Court in civil cases from the First District for the years 2010 through 2019.

We begin with the overall reversal rates for the First District, one area of civil law at a time.  All of the contract, commercial law, environmental law and wills and estates cases were reversed.  Four-fifths of the property law decisions from the First District were reversed.  The reversal rate for insurance law cases was 75%.  The rate for tax law cases was 71.4%.  Seventy percent of domestic relations decisions were reversed.  The reversal rate for civil procedure cases was 69.6%.  Two-thirds of election law and workers compensation cases were reversed.  The reversal rate for tort cases from the First District was 62.5%.  The reversal rate for government and administrative law cases was 57.6%.  The rate for constitutional law decisions was 53.3%.  Half of the employment law decisions were reversed.

For property law cases, Divisions One, Four and Five of the First District had 100% reversal rates.  The reversal rate for Division Two in property law was zero.  Similarly, the reversal rate for Divisions Two, Three and Six for insurance law cases was 100%.  The rate for Division Five was 66.7% and the reversal rate for Division Four was zero.  Division Three of the First District had a 100% reversal rate in tax law cases.  The reversal rate for Division One was 75% and the rate for Division Six was zero.  Three Divisions – Two, Five and Six – had reversal rates of 100% in domestic relations cases.  The reversal rates for Divisions One and Three were 50%.  The reversal rates in Divisions Two and Three for civil procedure cases was 100%.  The rate for Division Six was 80%.  Half of the civil procedure cases from Divisions Four and Five were reversed.  One quarter of civil procedure decisions from Division One were reversed.

The reversal rate for Division Two in tort cases was 83.3%.  The rate for Division One was two-thirds.  The reversal rate for Division Four was 62.5%, and the reversal rate for Division Three was 57.1%.  Half of the tort decisions from  Divisions Five and Six were reversed.  Turning to government and administrative law cases, the reversal rate for Division Two was 83.3%.  Two-thirds of decisions from Division Three were reversed.  The reversal rate for Division Six was 62.5%, and for Divisions One and Five, the rate was 50%.  The reversal rates for the First District on constitutional law cases were all over the place: 100% for Divisions Three, Five and Six, 20% for Division Four and zero for Division One.

Join us back here next time as we review the reversal rates for 2010-2019 from the Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Districts.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Michel Curi (no changes).

This time, we’re reviewing the reversal rates in civil cases, divided by the area of law, for the Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Districts of the Appellate Court between 2000 and 2009.

Overall, 77.8% of employment law cases were reversed by the Supreme Court.  The reversal rate for commercial law cases was 71.4%.  Two-thirds of property and election law cases were reversed.  The reversal rate was two-thirds for property and election law cases, 64.7% for government and election law, 62.5% for domestic relations, 60.4% for tort cases and 60% for workers compensation cases.  The reversal rate for civil procedure was 56.7%.  For insurance law cases, it was 53.3% and for contract and arbitration cases, the reversal rate was 50%.  Four subjects had reversal rates under one-half – wills and estates, constitutional law and tax law (each at 40%) and environmental law, for which the reversal rate was only 25%.

Not surprisingly, the highest individual reversal rate for tort cases was the Fifth District, at 83.3%.  Only 40% of Third District decisions were reversed.  The reversal rate for government and administrative law was 100% in the Third District, 80% in the Second, but only 42.9% in the Fifth.  The Fourth District’s reversal rate was 83.3% for domestic relations cases; for the Second, it was only 20%, and for the Fifth District, 0%.  For insurance law cases, reversal rates ranged from 100% for the Fifth District to only 20% for Third District cases.  The Third and Fifth Districts had 100% reversal rates for constitutional law cases, while the rate in the Second and Fourth Districts was only 25%.  Workers compensation ranged from 100% in the Third District to 25% in the Third and 0% in the Second.

Join us back here next time as we review the data for the years 2010 through 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Teemu008 (no changes).

Today, we’re continuing our review of civil reversal rates of the Districts and Divisions of the Appellate Court, divided by areas of civil law for the years 2000 through 2009.

Overall, the Supreme Court reversed 100% of the decisions from the First District in wills and estates law and arbitration.  Four-fifths of domestic relations decisions were reversed.  Three-quarters of cases involving property law were reversed, and 72.7% of tort cases were.  The reversal rate was 60.2% in tax cases, 50% in employment law, 44.4% in constitutional law cases, one-third in government and administrative law and commercial law, and 25% in contract law and election law.  The rate in insurance law was lowest: 11.2%.  None of the decisions in workers compensation or secured transactions were reversed.

Reviewing the individual divisions for outliers, everyone was very tightly clustered in tort cases except Division Five of the First District, which had a tort reversal rate of 100%.  Government and administrative law reversal rates ran from 50% in Division Two to zero in Division Four.  Divisions One, Two and Three had reversal rates of 100% in domestic relations cases – the reversal rate in Division Four for the decade was zero.  Civil procedure rates were all over the place – 100% in Divisions One and Three, 75% in Division Four, half in Divisions Five and Six and only 25% in Division Two.  All the constitutional law cases in Division Six were reversed.  The rate in Division Five was two-thirds.  The rate for Division Four was 50%.  All the constitutional law cases in Divisions Two and Three were affirmed.  In tax law, the reversal rate for Division Four was 100%, but the rate was zero for Divisions One, Two, Five and Six.

Join us back here next time as we review the reversal rates for the first decade of this century in the Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Districts of the Appellate Court.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Daniel X. O’Neil (no changes).

This time, we’re concluding the first step in our review of the Districts’ reversal rates, one area of civil law at a time, for the 1990s.  Overall, the reversal rate was 100% in wills and estates law and property law.  The reversal rate for workers compensation law was 82.4%.  Insurance law’s reversal rate was 78.3%.  The reversal rate for government and administrative law and contract law was 75%.  Domestic relations cases were reversed at a rate of 58.8%.  The reversal rate for tort cases was 57.8%.  The rate for environmental law cases was 57.1%.  Civil procedure cases were reversed at a rate of 55.6%.  Half the cases in constitutional law, arbitration law and election law were reversed.  One-third of decisions in employment law and commercial law were reversed.  The reversal rate for tax law cases was only 14.3%.

In tort law, the reversal rate was for the Fifth District was 73.1%.  Two-thirds of decisions in the Third District were reversed.  The reversal rate for the Fourth District was 52.4% and for the Second District – 44.4%.  Government and administrative law reversal rates were flat – 77.8% for the Fifth District, 75% for the Second and Fourth, and 71.4% for the Third District.  Domestic relations cases were flat too – two-thirds reversal for the Fourth and Fifth Districts, 60% for the Second and 50% for the Third.  The reversal rate for civil procedure cases was 82.6% in the Fifth District, 50% for the Fourth, 38.1% for the Second District and 33.3% for the Third.  All the insurance law cases for the Third and Fourth District were reversed.  The reversal rates for the Fifth District were 62.5% and for the Second – 60%.

The reversal rate for the Third District in constitutional law was 100%.  Half the con law cases for the Second and Fifth Districts were reversed, and one-quarter from the Fourth District.  All the workers compensation cases from the Fourth District were reversed.  The rate was 80% for the Fifth District and two-thirds for the Second and Third Districts.

Join us back here next time as we move forward to the reversal rates for the second decade – 2000 through 2009.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Kathleen (no changes).

Today, we’re beginning a new multi-part series of posts, looking at the reversal rates for each District and Division of the Appellate Court by the area of law involved in the case.  First up: the First District Appellate Court in the 1990s.  There was only one environmental law and one election law case, and each was reversed.  Three areas had a 75% reversal rate: domestic relations, property law and commercial law.  The reversal rate for tort law was 65.7%.  In civil procedure, it was 65.6%, and for government and administrative law cases, just a bit lower still – 65%.  The reversal rate for constitutional law was 54.6%.  Half of the wills and estates cases were reversed.  The reversal rates for both contract and arbitration cases were 40%.  Insurance was slightly lower at 38.5%.  One-third of workers compensation cases were reversed.  The lowest subject matter reversal rates for First District cases were in tax law – 25% – and employment law – 20%.

Reviewing the divisions of the First District for outliers, tort decisions were reasonably uniform.  The reversal rate from Division One was 87.5%, down to a low of 50% for Division Six.  Government and administrative law decisions were similar – 50% from Divisions One, Two and Four, 80% from Division Three.  The lowest overall reversal rate – employment law – also saw the widest variance: 100% for Division Two, zero from Divisions One, Four, Five and Six.  Civil procedure cases ranged from 28.6% reversal in Division One to 75% in Division Six.  Insurance decisions had a 100% reversal rate in Division Five, 50% in Divisions One through Three, and zero in Division Four.  Constitutional law had the same wide spread as employment law: 100% reversal rate in Division Two; 50% in Divisions Three, Four and Five; and zero in Divisions One and Six.

Join us back here next time as we review the data for the rest of the state.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Tomosius (no changes).

Today, we’re wrapping up our review of the tenures of all seven Justices.  This time, we’re reviewing Justices Carter and Overstreet’s record in criminal cases.

Justice Carter has written eight majority opinions in criminal cases.  Four have involved constitutional law, three have been in criminal procedure cases, and one opinion involved sex offenses.

Justice Carter has written only one dissent in a criminal case, in a case involving criminal procedure.

Justice Overstreet has written two majority opinions in criminal law.  One involved criminal procedure and one was in a constitutional law case.  Justice Overstreet has written no dissents so far in criminal cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr by James Jordan (no changes).

This week, we’re wrapping up our review of the records of all seven Justices of the Supreme Court.  Today, we’re looking at the opinions of Justices Robert Carter and David Overstreet in civil cases.  Tomorrow, we’ll turn our attention to the criminal cases.

Justice Carter has written a total of five majority opinions in civil cases.  Two involved civil procedure, one constitutional law, one tax law and one was a workers compensation case.

Justice Carter has written three dissents in civil cases – two in civil procedure cases and one in a tort case.

Justice Overstreet has written eight majority opinions in civil cases.  Two were in civil procedure cases, two in government and administrative law, and one each were in tax law, employment, election law and workers compensation.

Justice Overstreet has written only one dissent so far in a civil case – a matter last year involving tort law.

Join us back here tomorrow when we’ll conclude our series.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Giuseppe Milo (no changes).