Petition for Leave to Appeal

This time, we’re concluding our three-week trip through the data for originating jurisdictions, looking at the Court’s criminal cases between 2010 and 2020.

For these years, Cook County accounted for 156 criminal cases.  Will County was next, followed by Peoria, Du Page, Kane and Lake counties.

Several small counties made our second Table, producing between

This week, we’re wrapping up our three-week series on the geographical origins of the Court’s docket by reviewing the data for the years 2010 through 2020.

Between 2010 and 2020, the Court decided 150 civil cases which began in Cook County (once again, Cook is removed from the Table for readability).  There was a three-way

For the past several posts, we’ve been reviewing the jurisdictions where the Illinois Supreme Court’s civil and criminal cases originated.  This time, we’re looking at the criminal cases for the years 2000 through 2009.

Once again, we omit Cook County from the Table to make it easier to read.  Cook County produced 225 criminal cases

This week, we’re reporting the data for the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal cases during the years 2000 through 2009.

Once again, Cook County led by a wide margin, accounting for 172 civil cases.  Du Page and Lake counties – the second and third largest counties by population – were next, followed by the Industrial

In this post, we report the originating jurisdictions for the Court’s criminal cases during the years 1990 through 1999.  Once again, we omit Cook County from the chart to make it more readable; Cook County produced 268 criminal cases during the nineties.  Lake County, the third biggest county in terms of population, is second in

Today, we’re reviewing the contents of our database, which includes every case decided by the Illinois Supreme Court since January 17, 1990.  For every case, we’ve captured the following data points:

Official Reporter Citation

  1. E. Reporter Citation

Docket Number

Case Name

Petitioner

Petitioner Governmental Entity (Y/N)

Respondent Governmental Entity (Y/N)

Source of Appellate Jurisdiction

Originating

Last time, we began our analysis by addressing the competing theories of judicial behavior.  Formalism, the oldest theory, teaches that judicial decision making can be explained and predicted based upon the facts, the applicable law and precedent and judicial deliberations – and nothing more.  But if formalism explains all of judicial decision making, then many

Our latest repost:

We begin our analysis by addressing the foundation of the entire body of data analytic scholarship on appellate judging: competing theories of judicial decision making.

The oldest theory by far is generally known in the literature as “formalism.”  This is the theory we all learned in law school, according to which every

Our short series of contextual reposts continues:

Although the state Supreme Courts have not attracted anything near the level of study from academics engaged in empirical legal studies that the U.S. Supreme Courts and Federal Circuits have a number of different researchers have attempted to compare how influential the various state courts are for the