How Many Cases Involving the Elements of Violent Crimes Has the Court Decided a Year?

Yesterday, we reviewed the Court’s workers compensation caseload.  Today, we’re in the criminal docket, reviewing the Court’s history with cases involving the elements of violent crimes.  From 1990 to 2017, the Court decided fifty-seven cases in this area of law.

The Court decided two cases involving the elements of violent crimes in 1991, six in 1992, one in 1993 and 1994, seven in 1995 and two in 1996.

The Court decided three cases in 1997, six in 1998, two in 1999, three in 2000, two in 2002 and one in 2003.

The Court decided three cases involving the elements of violent crimes in 2004, one in 2005, two in 2006, and one each year in 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010.

The Court decided three cases in 2011, three in 2012, two in 2015 and three in 2016.

Join us back here next Tuesday as we take a closer look at the Court’s workers compensation decisions.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Jeff Sharp (no changes).

How Many Workers Compensation Cases Has the Court Decided a Year?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been taking an intensive look at the Court’s history with domestic relations and juvenile justice cases.  This week and next, we’re looking at workers compensation cases on the civil side, and on the criminal docket, cases involving the elements of violent crimes.

The Court has decided fifty-nine workers compensation cases since 1990.  The Court decided three workers comp cases in 1990, one in 1991, two in 1992 and 1993, six in 1994 and two in 1995 and 1996.

The Court decided three workers comp cases in 1997, four in 1998, three in 1999, four in 2000, one in 2001, three in 2002 and two in 2003.

The Court decided two workers comp cases in 2004, four in 2005, three in 2006 and 2007, and one per year in 2008, 2009 and 2010.

The Court had no workers comp cases in 2011 or 2012.  It decided three cases in 2013, two in 2015 and one in 2016.

Join us back here tomorrow as we turn our attention to cases from the criminal docket involving the elements of violent crimes.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Roman Boed (no changes).

How Has the Court Decided Juvenile Justice Cases Since 1990?

Yesterday, we reviewed the Court’s recent history with domestic relations cases.  Today, we’re over in the criminal docket, looking at juvenile justice cases.

Between 1990 and 2017, the Court decided eighty juvenile justice cases.  Only a bit over half of those cases – 51.25% – were won by the defendant/juvenile below.  The Court was slightly less likely to reverse these cases than the average across the entire docket.  The Court reversed 41.03% of the State victories it heard, 48.78% of the defendants’ wins it heard, and 48.75% of its juvenile justice cases overall.

In Table 801, we report the Court’s yearly number of State wins from the Appellate Court which were affirmed by the Supreme Court.  The Court affirmed one case in 1991, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2000 and 2001, three decisions in 2002, two in 2003, 2010 and 2011, one in 2013, two in 2014, one in 2015 and three in 2017.

The Court didn’t reverse a single State win from the Appellate Court in juvenile justice during the entire decade of the 90s.  The Court reversed one case in 2001, two in 2002, three in 2004, two in 2006, one in 2008, 2009, 2011 and 2012, three in 2016 and one in 2017.

Affirmances of juvenile defendant wins were nearly as scarce during the 90s as reversals of State wins.  The Court affirmed once in 1994 and once in 1997.  The Court reversed three times in 2001, twice in 2002, three times in 2003 and 2004, once in 2006, 2008, 2010 and 2012, twice in 2013 and twice in 2015.

The Court reversed one defendant win in 1995 and one in 1998, two in 2000, 2001 and 2003, one in 2004, five in 2008, two in 2010, and one per year in 2011, 2013, 2014 and 2017.

Looking at overall reversal rates regardless of who won below, the Court reversed only 20% of its juvenile justice decisions between 1990 and 1995.  The Court reversed in 42.86% of cases between 1996 and 2000.  Between 2001 and 2005, juvenile justice cases became more common, and the Court reversed in 46.43%.  Between 2006 and 2010, the Court reversed 68.75% of the time.  Since 2010, the Court has heard a relatively steady flow of juvenile justice cases and has reversed in 45.83%.

Join us back here next Tuesday as we turn our attention to the Court’s history with two new areas of law.

Image courtesy of Flickr by USFWS Midwest Region (no changes).

 

 

How Has the Court Decided Domestic Relations Cases Since 1990?

Last week, we reviewed the yearly docket of domestic relations cases on the civil side and juvenile justice decisions on the criminal side.  This week, we’re taking a deeper look at those two areas of law, looking both at the kinds of cases the Court has taken, what impact the winners below has on the reversal rate, and what the Court’s overall reversal rate is.

For domestic relations, we code as “conservative” decisions cases where the party disputing such issues as property settlements, support and/or custody prevailed.  “Liberal” decisions are cases where the party seeking settlements, support and/or custody won.  Since 1990, the Court has decided thirty-one conservative Appellate Court decisions, reversing in 67.74%.  The Court has decided forty-five liberal Appellate Court decisions in domestic relations, meaning that 59.21% of the Court’s entire domestic relations docket arises from liberal decisions below.  The Court has reversed 55.56% of the liberal decisions it has reviewed.

In Table 796, we review the yearly totals for conservative decisions affirmed by the Court.  The Court affirmed two such decisions in 1990, one in 1993, 1996 and 2002, two in 2004 and one in 2010, 2011 and 2013.

The Court reversed one conservative decision in 1990 and one in 1991.  The Court reversed twice in 1992 and once in 1996, 1998 and 2000.  The Court reversed three such decisions in 2003, one in 2004, two in 2007, three in 2008, two in 2011, one in 2012 and 2013 and one in 2017.

The Court affirmed one liberal decision per year in 1990, 1991, 1994, 1996, 1998 and 2000, two in 2001, one in 2004, two in 2005 and 2006, one in 2009 and 2010, two in 2013 and three in 2015.

The Court reversed two liberal decisions in 1990, one in 1992, 1994, 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000 and 2002, two in 2003 and 2004, one in 2005 and 2006, two in 2007, one in 2009, three in 2012, two in 2014 and one in 2015 and 2016.

Between 1990 and 2017, the Court reversed in 60.26% of its domestic relations cases – a rate several points above its overall reversal rate.  The Court reversed 56.25% of the time from 1990 to 1995.  The Court reversed 60% of its domestic relations cases from 1996 to 2000.  The Court reversed 55.56% of the time from 2001 to 2005.  The Court reversed 71.43% of the domestic relations cases it heard from 2006 to 2010.  Between 2011 and 2017, the Court reversed in 60% of its domestic relations cases.

Join us back here tomorrow as we further address the Court’s juvenile justice cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Chumlee10 (no changes).

How Many Criminal Cases Has the Court Decided a Year Involving Juvenile Justice Issues?

Yesterday, we began our look at the Court’s civil domestic relations cases.  Today, we’re looking at the Court’s eighty criminal cases the Court decided between 1990 and 2017 which principally involved juvenile justice issues.

The Court decided no juvenile justice cases in 1990 or 1992.  It decided one in 1991, 1993 and 1994, two in 1995 and one in 1996.

The Court decided two juvenile justice cases in 1997, one in 1998, three in 2000 and seven per year in 2001, 2002 and 2003.

The Court decided seven juvenile justice cases in 2004, three in 2006, seven in 2008, one in 2009 and five in 2010.

The Court decided four juvenile justice cases in 2011, two in 2012, four in 2013, three per year in 2014, 2015 and 2016 and five in 2017.

Join us back here next Tuesday as we continue our analysis of the Court’s domestic relations and juvenile justice cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Darrell Rudmann (no changes).

How Many Domestic Relations Cases Has the Court Decided a Year?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been taking an intensive look at the Court’s history with insurance law cases on the civil side and habeas corpus cases on the criminal side.  This week and next, we’re looking at two new issues – domestic relations cases from the civil docket, and cases involving juvenile justice issues on the criminal side.  First up – the Court’s seventy-eight domestic relations decisions.

The Court decided six domestic relations cases in 1990, two in 1991, three in 1992, one in 1993, two in 1994 and 1995 and three in 1996.

The Court decided one domestic relations case in 1997, three in 1998, three in 2000, two in 2001 and 2002 and five in 2003.

The Court decided six domestic relations cases in 2004, three in 2005 and 2006, four in 2007, three in 2008 and two per year in 2009 and 2010.

The Court decided three domestic relations cases in 2011, four in 2012 and 2013, two in 2014, four in 2015, one in 2016 and two in 2017.

Join us tomorrow as we turn our attention to the Court’s criminal cases involving juvenile justice issues.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Egvvnd (no changes).

How Have Defendants in Habeas Corpus Cases Fared at the Court?

Yesterday, we looked at how insurers have fared before the Court since 1990.  Today, we’re taking a deeper look at the Court’s habeas cases.

For the entire period, 81.48% of the Court’s habeas corpus cases were won by the prosecution below.  The Court reversed 30.68% of the decisions won by the prosecution below, but 55% of decisions won by the defendants.  Overall, the Court reversed in whole or in part in 78 of 211 cases – a reversal percentage of 36.11%.

Prosecution wins were affirmed in two cases in 1990, six in 1991, eight in 1992, three in 1993 and 1994, thirteen in 1995, six in 1996, seven in 1997, four in 1998 and 1999 and nineteen in 2000.  Nine prosecution wins were affirmed in 2001 and 2002, three in 2003, four in 2004, three in 2007 and eight in 2010.  The Court affirmed one prosecution win in 2011 and 2012, two in 2013, one in 2014 and 2015, two in 2016 and three in 2017.

The Court reversed one prosecution win in a habeas case per year in 1990, 1992 and 1993, three in 1994 and 1995, one in 1996, two in 1997, four in 1998, three in 1999 and nine in 2000.  The Court reversed three prosecution wins in 2001, seven in 2002, one in 2004, three in 2005, two in 2007, one in 2008 and two in 2009 and 2010.  The Court reversed three prosecution wins in 2013, one in 2014 and one in 2015.

The Court affirmed one defendants’ win in 1994 and 1995, two in 1996, one in 1997 and one in 1998.  The Court affirmed one defendant’s win in 2001, two in 2002, 2004 and 2005 and one in 2009 and 2010.  The Court affirmed one defendant’s win in 2012 and two in 2014.

The Court reversed one defendant’s win in 1990, two in 1991 and 1992, and one in 1993, 1999 and 2000.  The Court reversed one defendant’s win in 2002, two in 2003 and 2005, one in 2006, three in 2007 and two in 2008.  The Court reversed one defendant’s win in 2011, 2012 and 2016.

The Court reversed in 32.69% of its habeas cases from 1990 to 1995.  The Court reversed 30.77% of the time from 1996 to 2000.  The Court reversed in 39.22% of cases from 2001 to 2005.  The Court reversed 53.85% of its habeas cases from 2006 to 2010.  Finally, the Court reversed in 45.45% of its habeas cases from 2011 to 2017.

Join us back here next week as we turn our attention to two new areas of law.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Tony Webster (no changes).

How Have Insurer Parties Fared in Civil Cases at the Court?

Last week, we reviewed the number of cases the Court has heard, year by year, in insurance and habeas corpus law. This week, we’re taking a deeper look at the Court’s cases in these two important areas of law.

For the entire period, only 39.14% of the Court’s insurance law cases were won by the insurer below. Since 1990, the Court has reversed exactly half of the decisions it has reviewed where insurers won below, and 57.69% of the cases where plaintiffs won below. Overall, the Court has reversed in whole or in part in 62.65% of the Court’s 83 insurance law cases.

We review the Court’s insurer wins affirmed in Table 778. The Court saw no such cases affirmed in either 1990 or 1991.   Two cases were affirmed in 1992, one in 1993 and 1994, none in 1995 and 1996, three in 1997, one in 1998 and 1999, one in 2002, three in 2006 and 2007 and one in 2008. The Court has had no insurer affirmances since 2008.

The Court has seen one insurer win reversed in 1990, three in 1992 and one per year in each of the following years: 1993, 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2010 and 2013.

The Court saw two insurers’ losses from the Appellate Court affirmed in 1991. Three cases were affirmed in 1994, two in 1997 and 1998, 2001 and 2002, one in 2004 and 2005, two in 2005, one in 2007, two in 2010 and one in 2013 and 2015.

The Court saw two insurers’ losses reversed in 1990. Three cases were reversed in 1992, two in 1993, three in 1995, one in 1996, two in 1997, one in 1998 and 1999, two in 2000, one in 2001, 2002 and 2004, three in 2005 and one per year in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2015.

Between 1990 and 1995, the Court reversed, in whole or in part, 43.9% of its insurance law cases. The Court reversed 34.48% of its insurance law cases between 1996 and 2000. Between 2001 and 2005, the Court reversed 70.59% of its insurance law cases. The Court reversed 41.18% of the time between 2006 and 2010. Finally, the Court reversed 71.43% of its insurance law decisions between 2011 and 2017.

Join us tomorrow as we turn our attention to a closer analysis of the Court’s habeas corpus law decisions.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Hysterical Mark (no changes).

How Many Habeas Corpus Cases Has the Court Decided a Year?

Last time, we looked at the Court’s insurance law caseload.  Today, we’re reviewing the Court’s habeas corpus decisions.

Between 1990 and 2017, the Court decided 224 habeas corpus cases.  The Court decided four habeas cases in 1990, eight in 1991, eleven in 1992, five in 1993, seven in 1994, seventeen in 1995 and nine in 1996.

 

The Court decided ten habeas cases in 1997, nine in 1998, eight in 1999, twenty-nine in 2000, thirteen in 2001, nineteen in 2002 and five cases in 2003.

The Court decided seven habeas cases in 2004, fifteen in 2005, one in 2006, eight in 2007, three in 2008 and 2009, eleven in 2010 and two cases in 2011.

The Court decided three habeas cases in 2012, five in 2013, four in 2014, two in 2015 and three in 2016 and 2017.

Join us next Tuesday as we continue our examination of the Court’s insurance and habeas cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Antony Caldaroni (no changes).

How Many Insurance Law Cases Has the Court Decided a Year?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been looking at the Court’s government/administrative law and criminal sentencing cases.  This week and next, we’re going to look at the Court’s insurance law cases on the civil side, and its habeas corpus cases on the criminal law side.

Between 1990 and 2017, the Court decided eighty-six insurance law cases.  The Court decided three cases in 1990, two in 1991, nine in 1992, four per year in 1993, 1994 and 1995 and one in 1996.

The Court decided seven insurance law cases in 1997, five in 1998, three in 1999 and 2000, four in 2001, two in 2002 and three in 2003.

The Court decided three insurance law cases in 2004, five in 2005, four in 2006, five in 2007, two in 2008 and 2009, four in 2010 and one in 2011.

The Court decided one insurance law case in 2012, three in 2013, none in 2014, two in 2015 and none in 2016 or 2017.

Join us next time as we turn our attention to the Court’s habeas corpus caseload.

Image courtesy of Flickr by David Wilson (no changes).

 

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