Where Did the Fifth District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

Last time, we reviewed the data on the origin counties for the Supreme Court’s criminal cases from the Fifth Appellate District from 1990 to 2004.  Today, we’re looking at the data for the years 2005 to 2019.

The Court’s flow of criminal cases from the Fifth District has slowed somewhat in recent years.  In 2005, the Court decided one case each from Clinton, Madison, Saline and St. Clair counties.  In 2006, the Court decided one case each from Marion and Williamson counties.  The Court decided no criminal cases from the Fifth District in 2007, 2008 or 2009.

The Court decided one criminal case from the Fifth District in 2010 (Fayette county) and one in 2011 (St. Clair county).  The Court had no Fifth District cases in 2012.  The Court decided one case from Jackson county in 2013.  In 2014, the Court decided two cases from Randolph county and one each from Marion, Perry and St. Clair counties.

The Court decided one criminal case each from Jefferson and St. Clair counties in 2015.  In 2016, the Court decided one case each from Hamilton, Johnson, Madison and St. Clair counties.  In 2017, the Court decided one case from Effingham county, one from Madison and one from St. Clair.  The Court decided no criminal cases from the Fifth in 2018 and has decided none so far in 2019.

Finally, we compare each county’s share of the total population of the Fifth District counties to each county’s share of the civil caseload and the criminal caseload.

As we showed last week, St. Clair and Madison were 1-2 in their total contribution to the civil caseload.  The same counties are at the top of the criminal caseload, but they’re switched places: Madison county has produced 24% of the criminal cases and St. Clair has produced 21.33.  The rest of the cases are distributed across many counties, with four accounting for 5.33% of the cases each: Effingham, Jackson, Randolph and Williamson.  Twelve counties in the Fifth District have produced no criminal cases at the Supreme Court since 1990: Bond, Christian, Clay, Crawford, Edwards, Franklin, Gallatin, Hardin, Jasper, Lawrence, Monroe and White.

Join us back here next week as we turn our attention to a new topic.

Image courtesy of Flickr by David Ohmer (no changes).

Where Did the Fifth District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

Last week, we reviewed the data on which trial courts accounted for the Supreme Court’s civil cases from the Fifth District from 1990 to 2019.  This week, we’re reviewing the Court’s Fifth District criminal cases.

In 1990, the Court decided three cases from St. Clair, two from Madison county and one each from Jackson, Pope, Union and Wabash counties.  In 1991, the Court decided only one criminal case from the Fifth District, which originated in Marion county.  In 1992, the Court decided one case each from Madison, Montgomery, Randolph, St. Clair and Union.  In 1993, the Court decided one case each from Effingham, Fayette and Madison counties.  In 1994, the Court decided one case from Effingham, Randolph, Shelby and Williamson counties.

In 1995, the Court decided one criminal case from St. Clair county.  In 1996, there was one case each from Jackson, Madison and Williamson counties.  In 1997, the Court decided two cases from Madison county and one from Pulaski.  In 1998, the Court decided two cases from St. Clair and one from Madison.  The following year, the Court decided one case from Massac and St. Clair counties.

In 2000, the Court decided one case each from Jackson, Madison, St. Clair and Washington counties.  In 2001, the Court decided one case from Jefferson county.  In 2002, the Court decided one case from Alexander, Massac, St. Clair and Wayne counties.  In 2003, the Court decided three cases from Madison county and one from Johnson and Williamson counties.  In 2004, the Court decided three cases from Madison county and one from Effingham county.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the data for the years 2005 to 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Goddess of Rocks (no changes).

Where Did the Fifth District’s Civil Cases Come From (2005-2019)?

In 2005, the Court decided two civil cases from Franklin county, two from Madison and one from St. Clair and Williamson.  In 2006, the Court decided three cases from St. Clair and one each from Jackson, Jefferson, Madison and Perry counties.  In 2007, the Court decided one case from Madison county and one from Montgomery.  The following year, the Court decided one case from Madison and one from St. Clair.  In 2009, the Court decided three cases from St. Clair and one each from Clinton, Fayette, Marion and Williamson counties.

In 2010, the Court decided one case each from Jefferson, Marion and St. Clair counties.  In 2011, the Court decided two cases from Madison and one from Williamson.  In 2012, there were three cases from St. Clair county and one each from Clinton, Madison, Marion and Massac.  In 2013, the Court decided only one civil case from the Fifth District, from Effingham county.  In 2014, they decided one case each from Franklin, Marion and Washington counties.

In 2015, the Court decided two cases from St. Clair and one each from Jackson, Jefferson, Marion and Saline.  In 2016, there were two cases from Jackson and one each from Marion and Williamson.  The Court decided only one civil case from the Fifth in 2017, which originated in St. Clair county.  In 2018, there was one case from Crawford and one from Saline.  So far this year, there have been two cases from Madison county and one from Marion county.

In Table 1306, we compare each county’s percentage share of the total population of the Fifth District counties according to the 2010 census to each county’s share of the Supreme Court’s total caseload of civil cases from the Fifth District.  St. Clair county accounted for 28.22% of the civil cases and 20.7% of the population.  Madison county was 21.47% of the civil cases and 20.64% of the population.  Edwards county had an outsize representation, with only 0.52% of the population but 9% of the civil cases.  Jackson and Williamson county both produced 7.36% of the civil cases.  Jackson is 4.62% of the population, and Williamson is 5.09%.  Franklin and Jefferson county both produced 4.29% of the civil caseload.  Franklin was 3.03% of the population and Jefferson was 2.98%.

Seven counties in all produced no civil cases across the thirty-year period – Clay, Gallatin, Jasper, Johnson, Pulaski, Shelby and White.  An additional fourteen counties accounted for between zero and one percent of the civil cases – Alexander, Bond, Fayette, Hamilton, Hardin, Lawrence, Marion, Massac, Monroe, Perry, Pope, Union, Washington and Wayne counties.

Join us back here next week as we review the Court’s Fifth District criminal cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Chauncey Davis (no changes).

Where Did the Fifth District’s Civil Cases Come From (1990-2004)?

This week and next, we’re tracking the county Circuit Courts which accounted for the Supreme Court’s Fifth District civil and criminal cases between 1990 and 2019.  We begin with the civil docket.

The Fifth District is comprised of thirty-six counties in the southernmost part of Illinois, with a total population according to the 2010 census of 1,304,639: Alexander, Bond, Christian, Clay, Clinton, Crawford, Edwards, Effingham, Fayette, Franklin, Gallatin, Hamilton, Hardin, Jackson, Jasper, Jefferson, Johnson, Lawrence, Madison, Marion, Massac, Monroe, Montgomery, Perry, Pope, Pulaski, Randolph, Saline, Shelby, St. Clair, Union, Wabash, Washington, Wayne, White and Williamson.

In 1990, St. Clair county produced seven cases, Madison had two and Jackson and Wabash had one each.  In 1991, Madison and St. Clair had two cases each and five counties accounted for one: Alexander, Christian, Franklin, Jefferson and Marion.  In 1992, Madison county produced three cases, St. Clair and Williamson produced two each, and Bond, Lawrence and Wayne produced one each.  In 1993, the Court decided two civil cases each from Madison and St. Clair counties and one from Randolph and Williamson.  In 1994, the Court decided three cases from Jackson county, three from Madison, two from St. Clair and one each from Hamilton, Randolph and Williamson.

In 1995, two cases each originated in Effingham and St. Clair counties, and Christian, Franklin, Jackson and Williamson produced one each.  In 1996, there were two St. Clair cases and one each from Effingham, Jefferson, Madison and Marion.  In 1997, Jackson, Madison and St. Clair counties accounted for two cases each, and Montgomery county produced one.  In 1998, Madison county had two cases and Christian, Jackson and Marion counties had one each.  In 1999, Madison county again produced two cases and Franklin and Williamson counties had one each.

The Court decided three more cases from St. Clair in 2000 and one from Franklin, Madison and Monroe counties.  In 2001, the Court decided two civil cases from Madison county and one from Hardin, Jefferson and St. Clair.  In 2002, the Court decided four cases from St. Clair, two from Williamson county, and one from Christian and Madison counties.  In 2003, the Court decided one case each from Jefferson, Madison, Pope, Randolph and St. Clair counties.  In 2004, the Court decided two cases from St. Clair and one apiece from Crawford, Madison, Union and Wabash.

Join us back here next time as we review the civil-side numbers for the years 2005 to 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by NathanMac87 (no changes).

Where Did the Fourth District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

Today, we’re finishing our review of the county trial courts which accounted for the Supreme Court’s criminal cases from the Fourth District between 2005 and 2019 (to date).

In 2005, the Court decided three cases each from Champaign and Macon counties, and one apiece from Adams, Sangamon and Vermilion.  In 2006, the Court decided two cases from Champaign and one each from Ford, McLean, Moultrie, Sangamon and Vermilion.  In 2007, the Court decided one case each from Adams, Champaign and Macon.  The following year, the Court decided two cases each from Champaign and McLean counties and one case from Adams, Greene and Woodford.  In 2009, the Court decided one criminal case each from the following eight counties: Adams, Champaign, Clark, Livingston, McLean, Morgan, Sangamon and Vermilion.

In 2010, the Court decided one case each from Jersey, Livingston and Macon counties.  In 2011, the Court decided two cases from Champaign county and one each from Adams, Livingston, Macon, McLean and Schuyler.  In 2012, the Court decided two cases from Adams, Champaign and Coles counties and one from Ford.  In 2013, the Court decided one case each from Champaign, Livingston and McLean counties.  In 2014, the Court decided two cases from McLean county and one each from Champaign, Livingston, Macon and Vermilion.

In recent years, the Court’s Fourth District criminal cases have been spread across a number of different counties.  In 2015, the Court decided one case each from Adams, Macoupin, McLean and Sangamon.  The next year, it was one each from Champaign, Livingston and McLean.  In 2017, the Court had two Champaign county cases, but one from Coles and one from Schuyler.  In 2018, the Court decided a couple cases from McLean county and one from Adams, Champaign and Morgan.  In 2019 to date, the Court has decided one case from Macon county and one from McLean.

Finally, for all thirty counties, we chart (1) that county’s share of the total population of the Fourth District according to the 2010 census; (2) that county’s share of the total number of criminal cases decided by the Supreme Court 1990-2019; and (3) that county’s share of the total civil cases.

And we immediately reach a surprise: where Sangamon county was far and away the largest source of civil cases, producing a third of the total cases from the Fourth District, it ranks sixth among the thirty counties in criminal cases.  Or perhaps we should say a superficial surprise – the biggest single driver of Sangamon’s heavy presence on the civil side is government and administrative law cases generated by the state capital.

Champaign county leads on the criminal side.  It’s civil cases were close to in line with its population – 15.23% of the population and 17.65% of the civil cases, but 23.27% of the criminal cases.  McLean county was roughly in line across the board – 15.09% of the criminal cases, 13.73% of the civil cases and 12.85% of the population.  Vermilion was third, producing 12.58% of the criminal cases and 5.23% of the civil cases with 6.18% of the population.  Adams county was only lightly represented on the civil side – 2.61% of the cases with 5.08% of the population.  But it produced 8.8% of the criminal caseload.  Finally, the state capital – Sangamon county is 14.96% of the population, one-third of the civil cases, but only 6.92% of the criminal cases.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, twelve of the thirty counties produced not a single criminal case for the Supreme Court docket from 1990 to 2019.  Eight of those twelve counties that zeroed out on the criminal side also accounted for no civil cases – Brown, Calhoun, Cass, Jersey, Livingston, Mason, Moultrie and Schuyler.  Livingston was the largest of those counties at 2.95% of the population.  Brown, Calhoun and Schuyler were less than 1% of the population.  The remaining four counties which produced no criminal cases were Edgar – 1.41% of the population, 1.31% of the civil cases and no criminal cases; Scott, 0.65% of the civil cases, 0.41% of the population and no criminal cases; Cumberland – 0.65% civil, 0.84% population and no criminal; and DeWitt – 1.31% civil and 1.25% population, but zeroed out on the criminal docket.

Join us back next here next week as we address the data for the Fifth District.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Faungg’s Photos (no changes).

Where Did the Fourth District’s Criminal Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

Last week, we reviewed the county-by-county data for the Supreme Court’s Fourth District civil cases.  This week, we’re looking at the criminal side of the docket.

In 1990, the Supreme Court decided one criminal case each from Macon, McLean and Vermilion counties.  The following year, the Court decided only one criminal case from the Fourth, which originated in Champaign county.  In 1992, the Court decided one case each from Livingston, McLean, Sangamon and Vermilion counties.  The Court decided two criminal cases from McLean county in 1993 and one more from Livingston.  In 1994, the Court decided two cases from McLean and one each from Adams county and Champaign county.

In 1995, the Court decided two criminal cases which originated in Vermilion county and one from McLean.  In 1996, the Court decided one case each from Champaign, Livingston and Piatt counties.  In 1997, the Court decided two cases from Champaign, two from McLean and one each from Douglas, Menard, Pike and Vermilion counties.  In 1998, the Court decided one case from Adams county and one from Champaign.  In 1999, the Court decided two cases from Vermilion county and one from Champaign, Ford and Woodford counties.

The Court decided two criminal cases from Vermilion county in 2000 and one each from Champaign, Coles, Logan, Pike and Sangamon counties.  The Court had an unusually high number of Fourth District criminal cases in 2001 – four from Champaign, three from Adams, three from Sangamon and one each from Logan, Macoupin and Vermilion counties.  In 2002, the Court decided three cases from Vermilion county and one each from Champaign, Livingston, McLean and Morgan counties.  In 2003, the Court decided three cases from Vermilion and one each from Champaign, Coles, Macon and Piatt.  In 2004, the Court decided four cases from Champaign county, two from Macoupin and Sangamon and one each from Livingston, McLean and Pike counties.

Join us back here tomorrow as we finish our analysis with the years 2005 to 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Michael Curi (no changes).

Where Did the Fourth District’s Civil Cases Come From, 2005-2019?

In 2005, the Court decided two civil cases from Sangamon county and one from Vermilion.  In 2006, the Court decided two Sangamon county cases and one each from McLean, Menard and Scott counties.  In 2007, the Court decided two cases from Sangamon and one from Piatt and Pike.  In 2008, the Court decided four cases from Sangamon and one each from Adams, Champaign, Greene, Macon and McLean counties.  In 2009, the Court decided one case each from Cumberland, Edgar, Sangamon and  Vermilion counties.

In 2010, the Court decided two cases from Sangamon and one from Champaign county.  In 2011, the Court decided only three civil cases from the Fourth District, all from Sangamon.  In 2012, the Court decided three cases from Champaign county and one from Sangamon.  In 2013, the Court decided four cases from Sangamon county and one each from Macoupin, Piatt, Vermilion and Woodford counties.  In 2014, the Court decided two cases each from Macoupin and Sangamon.

The Court decided three civil cases from Champaign county in 2015 and one each from McLean and Sangamon.  In 2016, the Court decided only one Fourth District civil case, which originated in Macoupin county.  In 2017, the Court decided two cases from Sangamon and one each from Champaign and Macon.  The Court decided only one Fourth District case in 2018, which originated in Vermilion county.  So far in 2019, the Court has decided four civil cases from the Fourth District – two from Sangamon and one each from Macon and McLean counties.

So how close to the distribution of the Fourth District’s population were the civil cases between 1990 and 2017?

Champaign county is 15.23% of the population and 17.65% of the civil cases.  Sangamon county accounted for one third of the civil cases, but only 14.96% of the population.  McLean county produced 13.73% of the cases and accounted for 12.85% of the population.  Macon county produced 7.19% of the cases and 8.39% of the total population.  Vermilion county produced 5.23% of the civil cases and accounted for 6.18% of the population.  Adams county is 5.08% of the population, but only 2.61% of the civil caseload.

Among the smallest counties, Calhoun was 0.39% of the population and produced no civil cases.  Scott county was 0.41% of the population and 0.65% of the civil cases.  Brown county was 0.53% of the population and produced no civil cases.  Schuyler county was 0.57% of the population and accounted for no civil cases.  Cumberland county produced 0.65% of the civil cases and 0.84% of the population.  Finally, Menard county was only 0.96% of the population but produced 1.96% of the caseload.

Join us back here next week as we turn our attention to the Court’s Fourth District criminal cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr by NathanMac87 (no changes).

Where Did the Fourth District’s Civil Cases Come From, 1990-2004?

This week and next, our District-by-District analysis of the originating counties for the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal dockets continues with a look at the Fourth District.

The Fourth District contains thirty counties: Adams, Brown, Calhoun, Cass, Champaign, Clark, Coles, Cumberland, De Witt, Douglas, Edgar, Ford, Greene, Jersey, Livingston, Logan, Macon, Macoupin, Mason, McLean, Menard, Morgan, Moultrie, Piatt, Pike, Sangamon, Schuyler, Scott, Vermilion and Woodford.  Sangamon county, home of the state capital, is by far the biggest of these counties, accounting for one third of the District’s total population.  Champaign and McLean counties are the only two remaining counties who account for more than ten percent of the District, and eighteen different counties in the Fourth account for two percent or less of the total population of the District.

In 1990, Sangamon county produced six civil cases for the Supreme Court’s docket, Champaign one and Douglas one.  In 1991, Sangamon and Greene counties produced one case each.  1992 was a busy year: four cases from Champaign, two each from Ford, McLean and Vermilion, and one from Macon, Menard, Pike and Sangamon counties.  In 1993, the Court decided two civil cases each from Sangamon and Champaign counties.  In 1994, the Court decided four cases from McLean county, two from Champaign and one each from McLean, Morgan and Sangamon.

In 1995, the Court decided two civil cases from Sangamon county, two from McLean, and one each from Champaign, De Witt and Menard counties.  In 1996, the Court decided one case each from McLean, Sangamon and Vermilion.  The following year, the Court decided two civil cases from Macon county and 0one from Champaign, Coles, Logan and Sangamon.  In 1998, the Court decided two cases from Morgan county, and one from Douglas, Macon, McLean and Sangamon.  In 1999, the Court decided one civil case apiece from Adams, Clark, McLean and Sangamon counties.

The Court only decided two civil cases from the Fourth District in 2000 – one from Adams county and one from Sangamon.  In 2001, the Court decided two from McLean county and one each from Champaign, Macon and Sangamon.  In 2002, the Court decided three cases from Sangamon and one from De Witt, Edgar and McLean counties.  In 2003, the Court decided three cases from Sangamon, two from Macon and McLean, and one each from Adams, Coles and Vermilion counties.  In 2004, the Court decided three civil cases which originated in Champaign county and one each from Sangamon and McLean.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the data for the years 2005 to 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by COD Newsroom (no changes).

Where Did the Third District’s Criminal Cases Come From (2005-2019)?

Today, we continue our trip through the data for the trial courts which produced the Supreme Court’s Third District criminal cases between 2005 and 2019.

The Court decided three criminal cases from Will county in 2005, two in Grundy and Kankakee and one each in Henry, Rock Island and Warren counties.  In 2006, the Court decided four cases from Will county and one from Kankakee, LaSalle and Tazewell.  In 2007, the Court decided two cases from Peoria and one from Tazewell.  In 2008, the Court decided five cases from Will county, four from Peoria and one each from Bureau county, Rock Island county and Tazewell county.  In 2009, the Court decided three cases from Will county and one from Kankakee county and Peoria.

In 2010, the Court decided six cases from Peoria and one apiece from six different counties – Henry, Kankakee, Knox, LaSalle, Tazewell and Will counties.  In 2011, the Court decided three cases from Peoria and two from Will county.  In 2012, the Court decided four cases from Will county, three from Peoria and one from Henry, Kankakee and LaSalle.  In 2013, the Court decided six cases from Henry county and four from Peoria.  In 2014, the Court decided one case each from McDonough, Peoria, Stark and Whiteside counties.

In 2015, the Court decided four criminal cases from Will county and one from Peoria and Rock Island.  In 2016, the Court decided two from Peoria and Will and one from Bureau, Hancock, Tazewell and Whiteside counties.  The following year, the Court decided two criminal cases from LaSalle and Will counties and one from Peoria.  In 2018, the Court decided four cases from Will county and one from LaSalle and Rock Island counties.  So far in 2019, the Court has decided two criminal cases from Will county and one from Whiteside.

Finally, let’s compare, for each county in the District, the percentage share of the District’s population to that county’s share of civil and criminal cases.

Bureau county had proportional representation in the civil docket – 1.94% of the population and 1.75% of the civil cases – but overrepresented in criminal cases at 3.8%.  Fulton county was underrepresented on both sides – 2.05% of the population, 0.54% of the criminal cases and no civil cases at all.  Grundy county was overrepresented on the civil side and underrepresented on the criminal side – 2.78% of population, 3.51% of civil cases, 1.63% of civil cases.  Hancock county had 1.06% of the population and 1.63% of the criminal cases, but no civil cases.  Henderson county is quite small, only 0.41% of the District’s population, but produced no civil or criminal cases.  Henry county, which has 2.8% of the District’s population, produced 1.76% of the civil cases, but 6.52% of the criminal cases.

Iroquois county accounts for only 1.65% of the population, 0.88% of the civil cases and no criminal cases.  Kankakee county is 6.28% of the population as of 2010, 9.24% of criminal cases and 1.76% of the civil cases.  Knox county is 2.83% of the population, 4.39% of the civil cases and 2.17% of the criminal cases.  LaSalle county is 6.31% of the population, 7.07% of the criminal cases and 10.53% of the civil cases.  Marshall county contributed no criminal cases and only 1.75% of the civil cases.  It is 0.7% of the population of the District.  McDonough county is 1.81% of the population and 0.54% of the criminal cases, but 8.11% of the civil cases.  Mercer county is 0.91% of the District’s population and 0.54% of the criminal cases but produced no civil cases.

Peoria county is 10.33% of the population of the District.  It accounted for 19.57% of the criminal cases and 22.81% of the civil cases.  Putnam county is 0.33% of the population, produced no criminal cases and accounted for 2.63% of the civil cases.  Rock Island county is 8.17% of the population, 7.07% of the criminal cases and 9.65% of the criminal cases.  Stark county is only 0.33% of the population, 0.54% of the criminal cases and produced no civil cases.  Tazewell county is 7.5% of the population, 4.89% of the criminal case load and 6.14% of the civil cases.  Warren county accounts for only 0.98% of the population and is 1.63% of the criminal cases and 1.75% of the civil cases.  Whiteside county is 3.24% of the population, 3.8% of the criminal cases and produced no civil cases.  Finally, Will county is 37.52% of the total population of the District, but only 28.8% of the criminal cases and 28.07% of the civil cases.

Join us next week as we take up another District’s data.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Gary Todd (no changes).

 

Where Did the Third District’s Criminal Cases Come From (1990-2004)?

Last week, we reviewed the data on which county trial courts accounted for the Third District civil cases decided by the Supreme Court since 1990.  This week, we’re looking at the data for the criminal cases.

In 1990, the Supreme Court decided three cases from Will county, two from Rock Island county and one each from Knox, LaSalle and Whiteside counties.  In 1991, the Court decided three cases from Peoria county, two from Will county and one each from Kankakee and Rock Island.  The following year, the Court decided three cases from Will, two from Bureau county and one each from Knox, Tazewell and Whiteside.  In 1993, the Court decided one criminal case each from Hancock, Rock Island and Will.  In 1994, the Court decided one case from Mercer county and one from Whiteside.

In 1995, the Court decided two cases from Will county and one each from Kankakee, Knox and Warren.  In 1996, the Court decided one case from Peoria, one from Whiteside and one from Will.  In 1997, there were four criminal cases decided from Kankakee and one each from Tazewell and Warren.  In 1998, there was one case each from Grundy county, Kankakee and Will.  In 1999, there were only two criminal cases from the Third District, one from Kankakee and one from LaSalle county.

In 2000, the Court decided one criminal case from Bureau county, one from Kankakee and one from Peoria.  In 2001, the Court decided two cases each from LaSalle and Rock Island, one from Bureau and one from Peoria.  The next year, the Court decided three cases from Henry county, one from Fulton, one from Kankakee, one from Rock Island and one from Will county.  In 2003, the Court decided six cases from Will county and one each from Bureau, Kankakee, LaSalle, Peoria and Tazewell.  In 2004, the Court decided two cases each from Kankakee, LaSalle and Rock Island counties, and one case from Hancock, Peoria, Tazewell and Warren.

Join us back here tomorrow as we turn to the years 2005 through 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Michael Lucas (no changes).

LexBlog