How Has the Court Decided Criminal Cases Involving Sexual Offenses Since 1990?

Last week, we reviewed the year-by-year numbers for the Illinois Supreme Court’s history with two new areas of the law: civil cases involving employment law and criminal cases involving sexual offenses. Today, we’re taking a closer look at the sexual offense cases.

Since 1990, fifty-five percent of the criminal sexual offense cases which the Court has agreed to review were won by the prosecution at the Appellate Court. Not surprisingly, reversals of those prosecution wins by the Supreme Court are rare: the reversal rate for prosecution wins in 22.73%.

The Court affirmed one prosecution win in 1991, 2001 and 2003, two in 2004, four in 2005, one in 2009 and 2010, two in 2011 and 2012 and one in 2013 and 2017.

The Court reversed one prosecution win per year in 1997, 1999, 2003, 2010 and 2013.

Since 1990, the Court has reversed exactly half of the defendants’ wins it has reviewed. The Court affirmed one defendant’s win in 1991, two in 2000, one in 2001 and 2012, three in 2014 and one in 2016.

The Court reversed one defendant’s win in 1990, one in 2002, three in 2004, one in 2005 and 2009 and two in 2012.

For the entire period, the Court’s reversal rate in criminal cases involving sexual offenses is only 37.5%. From 1990 to 1995, the Court reversed one of three cases. From 1996 to 2000, the Court reversed two of four. From 2001 to 2005, the Court reversed 46.67% of its cases. From 2006 to 2010, the Court reversed two of four. From 2011 to 2017, the Court reversed only 21.43% of such cases.

Join us back here next Tuesday as we begin looking at two new areas of the law.

Image courtesy of Flickr by CheepShot (no changes).

How Has the Court Decided Employment Law Cases Since 1990?

Last week, we reviewed the Supreme Court’s docket in two new areas of law: employment on the civil side and cases involving sexual offenses on the criminal side.  This week, we’re taking a deeper look at both areas of law.

In employment law, the Court’s docket has been evenly split between cases won by the employer and the employee below – sixteen of each.  The Court has reversed employers’ wins from the Appellate Court at a rate noticeably higher than its overall reversal rate: 68.75%.  Only five employer wins have been affirmed since 1990 – one each in 1990, 1997, 2005, 2006 and 2009.

On the other hand, the Court reversed employers’ wins twice in 1990, once each in 1991, 1992, 2002, 2007 and 2008, and twice in 2009 and 2013.

The Court’s record with employee wins from the Appellate Court is a mirror image of its handling of employer wins.  Since 1990, the Court has reversed only 31.25% of cases won by employees below.  The Court affirmed one employee win in 1990 and 1991, two in 1992, three in 1996, one in 1999, two in 2001 and one in 2002.

The Court reversed one employee win in 1994, one in 2002, two in 2005 and one in 2014.

Since 1990, the Court has reversed in whole or in part in 53.13% of its employment law cases.  The Court reversed in half of its cases between 1990 and 1995.  The Court affirmed all five employment law cases it heard between 1996 and 2000.  The Court reversed in 62.5% of its cases between 2001 and 2005, and two-thirds of the time between 2006 and 2010.  Since that time, the Court has decided only three employment law cases, reversing completely in all three.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the Court’s criminal decisions involving sexual offenses.

Image courtesy of Flickr by AirGuy1988 (no changes).

How Many Cases Involving Sexual Offenses Does the Court Decide a Year?

Yesterday, we reviewed the Court’s yearly docket of employment law cases over on the civil side.  Today, we’re in the criminal docket – how many cases does the Court decide per year involving sexual offenses?  Since 1990, the Court has decided thirty-seven criminal cases involving sexual offense issues.

The Court decided one case in 1990, two in 1991 but none from 1992 to 1996.

The Court decided one case in 1997, one in 1999, two in 2000 and 2001, one in 2002 and two in 2003.

The Court decided five sexual offense cases in 2004, five in 2005, two in 2009 and two in 2010.

The Court decided two cases in 2011, five in 2012, two in 2013, three in 2014 and one per year in 2016 and 2017.

Join us back here next Tuesday as we dig deeper in the Court’s history with employment law cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr by CheepShot (no changes).

How Many Employment Law Cases Has the Court Decided a Year Since 1990?

This week, we’re beginning our review of the Court’s history with two new areas of law: employment law on the civil side, and prosecutions for sex offenses on the criminal side.

Since 1990, the Court has decided only twenty-four cases primarily involving issues of employment law.  We review the year-by-year data below.  The Court decided four cases in 1990, two in 1991, three in 1992, one in 1994 and three in 1996.

The Court decided one case in 1997, one in 1999, two in 2001 and three in 2002.

The Court decided three cases in 2005, one per year in 2006, 2007 and 2008 and three in 2009.

The Court decided one employment law case in 2012, two in 2013 and one in 2014.

Join us back here tomorrow as we address the Court’s history with sex offense prosecutions.

Image courtesy of Flickr by AbadonMi01 (no changes).

How Has the Court Decided Attorney Disciplinary Cases Since 1990?

Yesterday, we reviewed the Court’s experience since 1990 with tax law cases. Today, we’re looking at the Court’s history with attorney disciplinary cases. For the entire period, the Court decided 40 disciplinary cases. Attorney challengers won 55% of the cases the Court heard below. The Court reversed cases won by attorney challengers 45.45% of the time. The Court reversed wins of the Bar only 16.67% of the time.

The Court affirmed one challenger’s win in 1991, one in 1992, and one in 2006 – that’s it.

The Court reversed two challengers’ wins in 1990 and one each in 1999, 2003, 2009, 2011, 2012 and 2014.

The Court affirmed five wins of the Bar in 1990, three in 1991, one in 1992 and 1993, two in 1994, one in 1995 and 1997, two in 1999 and 2000 and one per year in 2002 and 2006.

The Court reversed one win of the Bar in 1991, one in 1993, two in 2000, one in 2004 and two in 2013.

Overall, the Court reversed 31.71% of its attorney disciplinary cases. Between 1990 and 1995, the Court reversed only 10.53% of its disciplinary cases. Between 1996 and 2000, the Court reversed 37.5% of its cases. Between 2001 and 2005, the Court reversed two of its three disciplinary cases. Between 2006 and 2010, the Court reversed one of three cases. Since 2010, the Court has reversed in whole or in part in all five of its disciplinary cases.

Join us back here next Tuesday as we turn our attention to two new areas of law.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Seligmanwaite (no changes).

How Has the Court Decided Tax Cases Since 1990?

Last week, we began our look at the Court’s recent history with tax cases and attorney disciplinary matters.  This week, we’re taking a closer look, using four metrics: (1) does the Court tend to take cases in this area of law won by one side or the other more often; (2) is the Court more likely to reverse one side or the other’s wins; and (3) irrespective of who won below, does the Court reverse in this area of the law more often than it does overall, suggesting that some districts of the Appellate Court might be out of sync with the Court’s views in the area?

Since 1990, 55% of the Court’s tax law cases were won by the party challenging the tax below.  The Court reversed 45.45% of challengers’ wins, but only 16.67% of the government wins it heard.  In Table 832, we chart the yearly number of cases in which a challenger’s win below was affirmed by the Court.

The Court affirmed once in 1990, twice in 1998, once in 1999, 2000, 2004 and 2005, twice in 2007 and once in 2008, 2010 and 2011.

The Court reversed one challenger’s win in 1996, 1999, 2003, 2004, 2006 and 2011.  The Court reversed twice in 2013 and once each in 2015 and 2017.

The Court affirmed two government wins in tax cases in 1994, one in 1995, two in 1998, one each in 1999 and 2000, two in 2001, one in 2007 and 2008 and two in 2009 and 2010.

As I noted above, reversals of government wins in tax cases have been few and far between.  The Court reversed once in 1990, once in 2005 and once in 2009 – that’s it.

Overall, the Court has reversed in whole or in part only 34.15% of its tax cases.  The Court reversed only 20% of its cases from 1990 to 1995, and only 20% from 1996 to 2000.  The Court reversed 42.86% of its tax cases between 2001 and 2005, but only 16.67% from 2006 to 2010.  Surprisingly, the Court has reversed entirely in 57.14% of its tax cases since 2010, and if partial reversals are included, the rate rises to 85.71%.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the Court’s decisions in attorney disciplinary cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Eric Fredericks (no changes).

How Many Attorney Disciplinary Cases Has the Court Decided a Year?

Yesterday, we reviewed the Court’s docket of tax cases.  Today, we’re reviewing the Court’s yearly attorney disciplinary cases.  Between 1990 and 2017, the Court has decided forty-three attorney disciplinary cases.

The Court decided ten attorney disciplinary cases in 1990, five in 1991, four in 1992, two in 1993, two in 1994 and one in 1995.

The Court decided one attorney disciplinary cases in 1997, three in 1999, four in 2000 and one per year in 2002 and 2003.

The Court decided one attorney disciplinary case in 2004, two in 2006 and one in 2009.

The Court decided one attorney disciplinary case in 2011, one in 2012, two in 2013 and one in 2014.

Join us back here next Tuesday as we turn our attention to a closer look at the Court’s tax law cases.

Image courtesy of Pixabay by rlobes (no changes).

How Many Tax Cases Does the Court Decide a Year?

For the last two weeks, we’ve been taking a close look at the Court’s docket of cases involving workers compensation on the civil side, and the elements of violent crimes on the criminal side.  Today, we’re starting our look at two new topics: tax law and attorney disciplinary decisions.  First, for the civil docket, we’re addressing the Court’s forty-one tax decisions since 1990.

The Court decided two tax decisions in 1990, two in 1994, and one each in 1995 and 1996.

The Court decided four tax cases in 1998, three in 1999, two in 2000 and 2001 and one in 2003.

The Court decided two tax cases in 2004, two more in 2005, one in 2006, three in 2007, two in 2008 and three in 2009 and 2010.

The Court decided three tax law cases in 2011, two in 2013, and one in 2015 and 2017.

Join us back here tomorrow as we turn our attention to the Court’s attorney disciplinary cases.

Image courtesy of Pixabay by Skeeze (no changes).

How Has the Court Decided Cases Involving the Elements of Violent Crimes Since 1990?

Last time, we took a close look at the Supreme Court’s cases involving workers compensation between 1990 and 2017.  This time, we’re looking at the Court’s caseload involving the elements of violent crimes.  For the entire period, 47.37% of the Court’s cases were won by the prosecution below.  The Court reversed 48.15% of the cases won by the prosecution at the Appellate Court, but reversed two thirds of the defendants’ wins.

In Table 819, we review the yearly totals for prosecution wins affirmed by the Supreme Court.  The Court affirmed once in 1992, five times in 1995 and once in 1996, 1999, 2000, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010 and 2015.

Prosecution wins reversed by the Supreme Court are reviewed in the next table.  There was one in 1997, three in 1998, one in 1999, two in 2000 and 2002 and one in 2004, 2006, 2007 and 2011.

We review the ten cases in which defendants’ wins were affirmed in the table below.  There were two in 1992, two in 1998, one per year in 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2009 and two in 2012.

The Court reversed two defendants’ wins in 1991, three in 1992, one in 1993 and 1994, two in 1995, one in 1996, two in 1997, one in 1998, two in 2011, one in 2012, one in 2015 and three in 2016.

For the entire period, the Court reversed in 61.4% of its cases involving the elements of violent crimes.  The Court reversed in 52.94% of its cases between 1990 and 1995, three-quarters of its cases from 1996 to 2000, 57.14% of its cases from 2001 to 2005, only one-third of its cases from 2006 to 2010, and 72.73% of its cases since 2011.

Join us back here next week as we turn our attention to two new areas of law.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Evan Courtney (no changes).

How Has the Court Decided Workers Compensation Cases Since 1990?

Last week, we reviewed the Court’s yearly docket of workers compensation cases on the civil side, and on the criminal side, cases involving the elements of violent crimes. This week, we’re taking a closer look at how the Court has handled both kinds of cases. Overall, the Court has decided fifty-nine workers compensation cases since 1990. Defendants won 54.24% of those cases at the Appellate Court level. The Court reversed 62.5% of defendants’ wins, but only 48.15% of workers’ wins.

In Table 814, we show the yearly distribution of the twelve defendants’ wins which the Court affirmed. The Court affirmed once in 1990, once in 1991, twice each in 1994 and 1995, once in 2000 and 2003, twice in 2005, and once in 2006 and 2016.

The Court has reversed twenty defense wins in workers compensation cases since 1990. The Court reversed two per year in 1990, 1994 and 1996, one in 1997 and 1998, two in 1999 and 2002, one in 2003 and 2004, two in 2005 and one in 2006, 2009, 2010 and 2013.

The Court has affirmed workers’ wins fourteen times since 1990 – once in 1992, twice in 1998, once per year in 1999, 2000, 2001, 2004 and 2006, three times in 2007, once in 2013 and twice in 2015.

The Court has reversed workers wins thirteen times – once in 1992, twice per year in 1993, 1994 and 1997, once in 1998, twice in 2000, once per year in 2002, 2008 and 2013.

Across the entire period, the Court has reversed in whole or in part in 57.63% of its workers compensation cases. The Court reversed in half of the sixteen cases it decided between 1990 and 1995. The Court reversed 75% of its cases between 1996 and 2000. The Court reversed in 58.33% of its workers compensation cases from 2001 to 2005. Between 2006 and 2010, the reversal rate was 44.44%. Since 2011, the Court has decided comparatively few workers compensation cases, reversing in half.

Join us back here later tonight as we turn our attention to the Court’s criminal decisions involving the elements of violent crimes.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Jim Simonson (no changes).

 

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