Which Counties Produced the Court’s Criminal Docket, 1990-2017?

Yesterday, we reviewed the overall data for the period 1990 through 2017 of the originating counties for the Supreme Court’s civil docket.  Today, we’re looking at the Court’s criminal docket.

Cook County accounted for 41.46% of the Court’s criminal docket between 1990 and 2017 – a slightly less predominant position than in the civil docket.  Du Page County produced 5.41% and Will County accounted for 5.08%.  Kane County produced 3.98% and Lake County accounted for 3.85%.  Champaign County produced 2.67%, the ARDC was 2.54% of the docket, and Peoria County produced 2.54%.  McLean County produced 2.09% of the docket.  St. Clair County produced 1.89%, Winnebago County 1.83%, and Kankakee County 1.76%.  Madison County accounted for 1.56%, Livingston 1.37%, Vermilion 1.24% and Sangamon County produced 1.04%.  Rock Island and Henry counties accounted for 0.98% of the Court’s criminal cases.  La Salle County accounted for 0.91%, Adams County 0.78%, Macon County 0.72%, Bureau County 0.65%, and Jefferson County produced 0.59%.

McHenry, Grundy and Tazewell counties accounted for 0.59% of the Court’s criminal docket each.  Whiteside, Coles and Boone counties accounted for 0.52%.  Randolph, Williamson and Ogle counties produced 0.46% of the criminal docket each.   Jackson, Clinton, Marion, Montgomery, Hancock, Macoupin and De Kalb counties produced 0.39% of the criminal docket.  Stephenson and Effingham counties produced 0.33%.  Knox, Iroquois, Jo Daviess, Warren, Pike and Kendall counties accounted for 0.26% each.

Union, Schuyler, Mason, Douglas, Lee, Ford and Wayne counties all accounted for 0.2%, and unknown trial courts were 0.2% too.  The following counties produced 0.13% of the Court’s criminal docket: Edgar, Saline, McDonough, Fayette, Cumberland, Piatt, Fulton, Massac, Woodford, Logan and Morgan.

Johnson and Stark counties both accounted for 0.13% of the Court’s criminal docket.  A great many jurisdictions produced one case each: Wabash, Pope, Jasper, Mercer, El Paso, Shelby, Menard, Pulaski, Washington, Alexander, Moultrie, Greene, Clark, Jersey, Perry and Hamilton counties, original jurisdiction cases, and administrative cases on direct appeal.

Join us back here next Tuesday as we turn our attention to another issue in the Illinois Supreme Court’s decision making.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Trailnet (no changes).

Which Counties Produced the Court’s Civil Docket, 1990-2017?

Over the past several weeks, we’ve been tracking the county trial courts which have produced the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal dockets between 1990 and 2017.  This week, we’re reviewing the overall data for the entire period.

Between 1990 and 2017, Cook County accounted for 44.68% of the Court’s civil cases.  Du Page County produced 5.83%, Lake produced 4.36% and Sangamon County accounted for 4.28%.  Direct administrative appeals were 3.84%, St. Clair County was 3.69% and Madison County was 3.25%.  Will County produced 2.36% of the Court’s civil cases and Champaign County accounted for 2.22%.  Seven cases produced between one and two percent of the Court’s civil cases – Peoria, 1.99%; Kane, 1.77%; McLean, 1.4%; McHenry, 1.18%; Winnebago, 1.11, and Jackson and Macon – 1.03% each.  Rock Island County produced 0.96% of the Court’s civil docket.  Williamson County accounted for 0.89% and La Salle County produced 0.86%.  Original jurisdiction cases, certified question appeals from the Northern District of Illinois and Franklin County produced 0.66% of the Court’s civil docket each.

Tazewell County accounted for 0.59% of the Court’s civil docket.  Vermilion, Marion and Jefferson County produced 0.52% each.  Macoupin County accounted for 0.37%.  Eight counties produced 0.3% of the Court’s civil docket – Grundy, Christian, Ogle, Effingham, Knox, Adams and Kendall counties, and cases in which the county trial court could not be identified.   Bureau, Johnson, Menard, Boone, Putnam, Randolph, Morgan, Lee, Stephenson, Coles and McDonough counties have all accounted for 0.22% of the Court’s civil docket.

Thirteen counties accounted for 0.15% of the Court’s civil docket – Warren, Douglas, Kankakee, Wabash, De Kalb, Greene, Ford, Henry, DeWitt, Montgomery, Edgar, Piatt and Clinton.  Marshall, Iroquois, Alexander, Wayne, Bond, Lawrence, Hamilton, Logan, Mason, Moultrie and Clark counties all produced 0.07% of the Court’s civil docket apiece.

In Table 665, we report the remainder of the civil docket counties.  The following counties produced 0.07% of the Court’s civil docket each: Monroe, Hardin, Pope, Crawford, Union, Perry, Scott, Pike, Cumberland, Fayette, Jersey, Massac, Woodford, Washington and Saline.  Finally, 0.07% of the Court’s civil docket originated in the United States District Court for the Central District of Illinois.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the overall data for the Court’s criminal docket.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Wally Slowik, Jr. (no changes).

 

Which Trial Courts Produce the Court’s Criminal Docket (Part 6)?

Yesterday, we examined the trial courts which produced the Supreme Court’s civil docket for the years 2015 through 2017.  Today, we’re looking at the data for the Court’s criminal docket.

In 2015, the Court decided sixteen criminal cases from Cook County, four from Will and three from Kane County.  The Court decided one case each from Du Page, McLean, Rock Island, St. Clair, Peoria, Jefferson, Sangamon, Macoupin, Adams and De Kalb counties.

In 2016, the Court decided sixteen criminal cases from Cook County, three from Will County and two from McLean and Peoria counties.  The Court decided one case each from Du Page, Whiteside, Madison, St. Clair, Champaign, Bureau, Livingston, Tazewell, Hancock, Johnson, Kendall and Hamilton counties.

Last year, the Court decided seventeen criminal cases from Cook County.  The Court decided two cases from Will, La Salle and Champaign counties.  Finally, the Court decided one case each from Winnebago, Du Page, Madison, St. Clair, Peoria, Kane, Schuyler, Coles, Effingham and Boone counties, and one case within the Court’s original jurisdiction.

Join us back here next Tuesday as we summarize our twenty-eight years of geographical data.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Jay Sturner (no changes).

 

Which Trial Courts Produce the Court’s Civil Docket (Part 6)?

For the past several weeks, we’ve been reviewing the year-by-year data to determine which trial courts have produced the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal dockets.  This week, we’re reviewing the years 2015 through 2017.  Today: the civil docket.

In 2015, the Court decided seventeen civil cases from Cook County.  The Court decided four cases from Lake County, three from Champaign County, and two from St. Clair, Will and Sangamon County, and two on direct appeal from various administrative boards and agencies.  The Court decided one civil case apiece from Warren, Du Page, Madison, Peoria, McHenry, Jackson, Winnebago, Jefferson, McLean, Macon, Stephenson and Saline counties.

In 2016, the Court decided sixteen civil cases from Cook County.  The Court decided two cases from Madison and Jackson counties, and the Court decided one case each from Will, Peoria, Winnebago, Rock Island, Williamson and Macoupin counties, one on direct administrative appeal, and one on certified question appeal from the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois.

Finally, in 2017, the Court decided eleven civil cases from Cook County.  The Court decided three cases from Lake County and two from Sangamon County.  The Court decided one civil case each from St. Clair, Will, Peoria, Champaign, Kane, Macon and Grundy counties, and one on direct administrative appeal.

Join us back here tomorrow as we examine the Court’s criminal docket for the years 2015 through 2017.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Roman Boed (no changes).

Which Trial Courts Produce the Court’s Criminal Docket (Part 5)?

Yesterday, we reviewed the trial courts from which the Court’s civil docket came for the years 2010 through 2014.  Today, we’re looking at the criminal docket.

In 2010, the Court decided twenty-three cases from Cook County, six from  Peoria, four from Du Page, three from Kane County, and two each from Lake, Winnebago and Boone counties.  The Court decided one case from Will, LaSalle, Knox, Macon, Kankakee, Clinton, Livingston, Tazewell, Hancock, Fayette, Henry, De Kalb and Jersey counties.

In 2011, the Court decided twenty-six criminal cases from Cook County.  The Court decided four cases from Du Page, three from Peoria, two from Lake, Will and Champaign counties, and one each from McLean, St. Clair, Macon, Kane, Schuyler, Livingston, Boone and Adams counties, and from the ARDC.

In 2012, the Court decided thirteen criminal cases from Cook County.  The Court decided five cases from Will County, three from Peoria, two from Lake County, and one each from Rock Island, La Salle, Kankakee, Champaign, Stephenson, Coles, Adams, Henry and Ford counties, as well as one from the ARDC.

In 2013, the Court decided twenty-one criminal cases from Cook County.  The Court decided three cases from Lake and Henry counties, and two from Peoria.  The Court decided one criminal case from Winnebago, Jackson, McLean, Champaign, Kane, Clinton, Livingston and Adams counties, and one case from the ARDC.

The Court’s criminal docket for 2014 was widely dispersed around the state.  The Court decided only eleven cases from Cook County, three from Kane County and two from Randolph and McLean counties.  The Court decided one case each from Lake, Du Page, Vermilion, Whiteside, St. Clair, Macon, Peoria, Champaign, Marion, Livingston, McDonough, Stark, Kendall and Perry counties, as well as one case on direct administrative appeal and one case from the ARDC.

Join us back here next Tuesday as we look at the data for the years 2015 through 2017.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Karl-Ludwig Poggemann (no changes).

Which Trial Courts Produce the Court’s Civil Docket (Part 5)?

For the past several weeks, we’ve been reviewing, one year at a time, the trial courts which have produced the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal dockets.  This week, we’re reviewing the years 2010 through 2014.

In 2010, the Court decided twenty-two civil cases from Cook County, two cases from Sangamon and Kane counties, and one case each from St. Clair, Will, La Salle, Champaign, Jefferson, Marion and Tazewell counties.

In 2011, the Court decided fifteen civil cases from Cook County.  The Court decided four cases from Lake and Du Page counties, three from Sangamon County, and two from Will and Madison counties, and two direct appeals from administrative agencies.  The Court decided one case apiece from Peoria, Winnebago, Kane, Williamson and Jersey counties, as well as one certified question appeal from the Northern District of Illinois.

In 2012, the Court decided nineteen civil cases from Cook County.  The Court decided three cases from St. Clair, Du Page and Champaign counties.  The Court decided two cases from Will County, and one each from Sangamon, Lake, Madison, Kane, Marion, Lee, Kendall, Clinton and Massac counties and one certified question appeal from the Northern District of Illinois.

The Court decided thirteen civil cases from Cook County and four from Sangamon County.  The Court decided two cases from Du Page and La Salle counties, and two cases on direct appeal from administrative agencies.  The Court decided one case each from Will, Lake, McHenry, Kane, Putnam, Vermilion, Effingham, Stephenson, Macoupin, Piatt and Woodford counties.

In 2014, the Court decided thirteen civil cases from Cook County.  The Court decided three civil cases from Sangamon County, two from Lake and Macoupin counties, and one each from Peoria, Kane, Franklin, Marion, Kendall and Washington counties, and one case on direct appeal from an administrative agency.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the Court’s criminal docket for the same years.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Spiro Bolos (no changes).

Which Trial Courts Produce the Court’s Criminal Docket (Part 4)?

For the past three weeks, we’ve been reviewing the year by year data for which trial courts have produced the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal dockets.  Yesterday, we looked at the data for the civil docket between 2005 and 2009.  Today, we’re reviewing the data for the criminal docket for the same years.

In 2005, the Supreme Court decided twenty-one criminal cases from Cook County.  The Court decided six criminal cases from Du Page County, three from Will, Macon and Champaign counties, and two from Kankakee, Kane, Grundy and Boone counties.  The Court decided one case each from Winnebago, Vermilion, Madison, Rock Island, St. Clair, Clinton, McHenry, Sangamon, Saline, Coles, Adams, Ogle, Warren, Henry and Douglas counties.

For the year 2006, the Court decided twenty criminal cases from Cook County.  The Court decided four criminal cases from Will and Kane counties.  The Court decided two cases each from Lake, Champaign and Marion counties, as well as two cases from the ARDC.  The Court decided one criminal case each from Winnebago, Du Page, Vermilion, McLean, St. Clair, La Salle, Kankakee, Sangamon, Tazewell, Ogle, Pike, Ford, Moultrie and Stark counties.

For 2007, the Court decided fifteen criminal cases from Cook County.  The Court heard two cases each from Du Page and Peoria counties.  The Court decided one criminal case from Winnebago, Union, Macon, Champaign, Kane, Livingston, Tazewell, Adams and De Kalb counties.

For 2008, the Court decided nineteen criminal cases from Cook County.  The Court decided five cases from Will County, four from Du Page, and three from Peoria.  The Court decided two cases apiece from Lake, Winnebago, McLean, Champaign and Grundy counties.  The Court decided one criminal case apiece from Rock Island, Kane, McHenry, Bureau, Tazewell, Adams, Woodford and Greene counties.

Finally, in 2009, the Court’s criminal cases from Cook County jumped to twenty-six.  The Court decided five cases from Will County, four from Du Page, and two from Livingston and Kendall counties.  The Court decided one case each from Lake, Winnebago, McLean, Peoria, Kankakee, Champaign, Sangamon, Iroquois, Morgan and Clark counties, as well as one case from the ARDC.

Join us back here next week as we review the Court’s civil and criminal dockets for the years 2010 through 2014.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Jeff Sharp (no changes).

Which Trial Courts Produce the Court’s Civil Docket (Part 4)?

For the past three weeks, we’ve been reviewing which county trial courts have produced the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal dockets since 1990.  This week, we’re reviewing the years 2005 through 2009.

In 2005, the Court decided twenty-five civil cases from Cook County.  The Court decided four cases each from Madison and Franklin counties, two from Sangamon and Lake counties, and one case each from St. Clair, Du Page, Peoria, McHenry, Ogle, Kane, Rock Island, Williamson, Vermilion and Henry counties, as well as one direct administrative appeal.

In 2006, the Court decided twenty-one civil cases from Cook County.  The Court decided three cases apiece from St. Clair, Sangamon, Lake and McHenry counties, two cases from Rock Island County, and one case each from Du Page, Madison, Peoria, La Salle, Jackson, Winnebago, Kane, Jefferson, Menard, Coles, Kendall, Perry and Scott counties.

In 2007, civil cases from Cook County were flat at twenty-one.  The Court decided three cases on direct administrative appeal.  The Court decided two civil cases from Will, Sangamon and Lake counties.  Finally, the Court decided one civil case each from Du Page, Madison, Peoria, Winnebago, Rock Island, Tazewell, Knox, Lee, Montgomery, Piatt and Pike counties.

Civil cases from Cook County in 2008 dropped to sixteen.  The Court decided four cases each from Sangamon, Lake and Du Page counties, and three from Will County.  The Court decided two civil cases on direct administrative appeal.  The Court decided one civil case each from St. Clair, Madison, Peoria, Champaign, Kane, Greene, McLean, Macon and Adams counties.

Civil cases from Cook County were down to their lowest levels of this period in 2009 – the Court decided only thirteen civil cases from Cook.  The Court decided five civil cases from Du Page County, four from Will, three from St. Clair and Lake, and two cases on direct administrative appeal.  Finally, the Court decided one civil case each from Sangamon, Winnebago, Marion, Williamson, Vermilion, Grundy, Edgar, Clinton, Cumberland and Fayette counties.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the Court’s criminal docket for the same years.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Roman Boed (no changes).

Which Trial Courts Produce the Court’s Criminal Docket (Part 3)?

Yesterday, we reviewed which trial courts produced the Court’s civil docket between 2000 and 2004.  Today, we’re looking at the data for the docket of criminal, quasi-criminal and attorney disciplinary cases during the same years.

As you can see in Table 631 below, the criminal docket is usually more scattered as a geographical matter than the civil docket is.  The Court decided thirty-five criminal cases in 2000 which arose from Cook County.  The Court decided five cases each from Du Page and St. Clair counties.  The Court decided four cases which arose from the ARDC and the Bar Court, three from Lake and Kane counties, and two from Will, Vermilion, Madison, McLean and Jefferson counties.  The Court decided one case each from Jackson, La Salle, Peoria, Kankakee, Champaign, Marion, McHenry, Sangamon, Randolph, Bureau, Grundy, Coles, Livingston, Iroquois, Jo Daviess, Douglas, Lee, Pike, Logan and Washington counties.

The Court decided fifteen criminal cases from Cook County in 2001.  The Court decided six cases from Kane County, five from Du Page and Champaign counties, three from La Salle, Sangamon and Adams counties, and two each from Lake, Rock Island and Kankakee counties.  The Court decided one criminal case each from Winnebago, Will, Vermilion, McLean, Peoria, Jefferson, Stephenson, McHenry, Bureau, Macoupin, Logan and De Kalb counties.

In 2002, the Court decided twenty-six criminal cases from Cook County.  The Court decided six cases from Kane County, five from Henry County, three from Du Page and Vermilion counties, and two from Winnebago, Will, Peoria, Sangamon and De Kalb counties.  The Court decided one criminal case apiece from Lake, Whiteside, McLean, Rock Island, St. Clair, Kankakee, Champaign, Montgomery, Livingston, Hancock, Ogle, Fulton, Massac, Wayne, Alexander and Morgan counties, as well as one case from the ARDC.

In 2003, the Court decided twenty-seven criminal cases from Cook County.  The Court decided six cases each from Du Page and Will counties.  The Court decided three cases each from Lake, Vermilion and Madison counties and two cases from Bureau County.  The Court decided one criminal case each from Winnebago, La Salle, Macon, Peoria, Kankakee, Champaign, Williamson, Kane, McHenry, Sangamon, Coles, Tazewell, Piatt and Johnson counties, as well as one case from the ARDC.

Finally, in 2004, the Court decided twenty criminal cases from Cook County.  The Court decided five cases from Champaign County, three from Madison and two each from Winnebago, Du Page, Will, Rock Island, La Salle, Macon, Peoria, Kankakee, Sangamon, Livingston and Macoupin counties.  The Court decided one criminal case each from Lake, McLean, Kane, McHenry, Tazewell, Effingham, Hancock, Ogle, Warren and Pike counties, as well as one case from the ARDC and Bar Courts.

Join us back here next Tuesday as we review the civil and criminal dockets for the years 2005 through 2009.

Image courtesy of Flickr by William Garrett (no changes).

Which Trial Courts Produce the Court’s Civil Docket (Part 3)?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been reviewing which trial courts, year by year, have produced the Court’s civil and criminal dockets.  This week, we’re looking at the years 2000 through 2004 – first up, the civil cases.

In 2000, the Court decided nineteen civil cases from Cook County.  The rest of the cases were widely scattered.  The Court decided three cases each from St. Clair and Lake counties, two from Winnebago, and one each from Will, Sangamon, Du Page, Madison, McHenry, Kane, Franklin, Adams and Monroe counties, as well as one case in the Court’s original jurisdiction and one direct appeal from an administrative board.

In 2001, the Court decided twenty-four civil cases from Cook County.  The Court decided five from Du Page and two from Will, Sangamon, Madison and McLean counties, as well as two cases arising from the Court’s original jurisdiction.  The Court decided one case each from St. Clair, Lake, Champaign, Ogle, Kane, Jefferson, Macon, Tazewell, McDonough, Hardin and Kendall counties, as well as one certified question from the Northern District of Illinois, by way of the Seventh Circuit.

The data for 2002 is reported in Table 628 below.  The Court decided twenty-two civil cases from Cook County that year.  The Court decided four cases from St. Clair and Du Page counties, three from Champaign County, two from Williamson and Tazewell, and one each from Will, Madison, Peoria, McHenry, Jackson, Kankakee, Kane, Christian, Boone, McLean, DeWitt and Edgar counties, plus once again a single case on certified question from the Northern District of Illinois.

In 2003, the Court decided seventeen civil cases from Cook County.  The Court decided four cases from Sangamon County and two apiece from Will, Du Page, Madison, McHenry, McLean and Macon counties.  The Court decided one civil case from St. Clair, Lake, Kane, Jefferson, Rock Island, Putnam, Vermilion, Randolph, Knox, Coles, Adams and Pope counties, plus one more certified question from the Northern District of Illinois.

Finally, in 2004, the Court decided twenty-three civil cases from Cook County.  The Court decided six cases from Du Page County, four from Champaign, three from St. Clair and Lake counties and two from Peoria County.  The Court decided one case apiece from Will, Sangamon, Madison, La Salle, Wabash, Winnebago, Kane, Rock Island, McLean, Crawford and Union counties, plus one case on direct appeal from an administrative agency, and one certified question, this time from the Central District of Illinois.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the data for the criminal docket between 2000 and 2004.

Image courtesy of Flickr by DoD News (no changes).

 

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