How Often Have the Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Districts of the Appellate Court Been Reversed in Civil Cases, 1990-2019?

In Table 1342 below, we report the three-year floating average reversal rates for the Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Appellate Districts for the years 1992 to 1999.  The Second District fared best during these years.  The Third and Fourth were relatively equal, and the Fifth District fared worst.

The Second District had only one spike, to a reversal rate of 73.68% in 1995.  The Third District began at 76.19% in 1993 but was otherwise between half and two-thirds.  The Fourth District had a reversal rate of 73.08% in 1992 and 73.68% in 1997.  The Fifth District was at 80.95% in 1999, 80.65% in 1992, and in the seventies for 1993, 1996, 1997 and 1998. \

The years 2000 to 2009 were similar.  The Second District reached a high of 70% reversal in 2004.  The Third District was quite low throughout the decade – 28.57% in 2001, 25% in 2002, 33.33% in 2006 and 35.71% in 2007.  The Fourth District was just slightly higher, with its reversal rate in the forties and fifties each year.  The Fifth District remained the highest reversal rate in the state: 81.25% in 2001, 75% in 2002 and 2003, 70.59% in 2007 and 90.91% in 2009.

The Fourth District has fared quite well between 2010 and 2019.  The Second District was fairly high for the first five years of the decade and lower since; the Third District was the reverse.  The Second reached a reversal rate of 76.47% in 2014 before dropping to 30.77% in 2017 and 42.86% in 2018.  The Third District was in the fifties from 2011 to 2014 but reached 71.43% in 2016, 70% in 2017 and 2018 and two-thirds so far in 2019.  The Fourth District was very low throughout: 30% in 2012, 2016 and 2017, 50% in 2018 and only 44.44% in 2019.  The Fifth District reversal rate was very high for the first half of the decade, but has improved considerably since: 92.31% (2010); 85.71% (2011); 78.57% (2012); 81.82% (2013); 90.91% (2014) and 90% (2015), then 64.29% (2016); 58.33% (2017) and 37.5% (2018) and two-thirds so far this year.

In our final table, we report the overall reversal rate of each Division and District for the years 1990 to 2019.  The Divisions of the First District and the Second, Third and Fourth Districts have all been quite close: 54.22% for 1.1; 60.98% for 1.2; 60.75% for 1.3; 51.16% for 1.4; 58.82% for 1.5; 55.7% for 1.6; 54.37% for the 2nd, 57.26% for the Third and 54.82% for the Fourth.  The thirty-year civil reversal rate for the Fifth District is 73.3%.

Next week, we’ll review the data on the criminal side of the docket.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Roger W (no changes).

How Often Have the Divisions of the First District Been Reversed in Civil Cases, 1990-2019?

For the past several weeks, we’ve been reviewing the county by county data for civil and criminal cases at the Supreme Court.  This week and next, we’ll be looking at the reversal rates for the Districts and Divisions of the Appellate Court.  First up today – Chicago’s First District.  Since it’s difficult occasionally to confirm which Division of the First District a case arose from, we divide the data into seven courts – Divisions One through Six and a catch-all for unallocated First District cases.   Because individual Divisions typically have no more than 2-4 cases decided by the Court in any given year, we use three- year floating average reversal rates – thus, the numbers reported below as “1992” are the combined reversal rate for the years 1990, 1991 and 1992.  We then drop the 1990 data and add 1993 to report the next year (and so on).

As reported in Table 1339, reversal rates in the First District tended to cluster around the 50-60% mark through most of the 90s.  Divisions 1, 2, 3 and 5 all had spikes, as did the unallocated First District cases.  Division 1 hit 80% reversal in 1993; Division 2 reached 75% in 1996; Division 3 reached 81.25% in 1996 and Division 5 was at 100% in 1997.  The unallocated cases were reversed at an 87.5% clip in 1996.  Only Divisions 4 and 6 were consistent across the period, seldom dipping or spiking.  Unallocated cases were at 22.22% in 1993 and 33.33% in 1994.  Division 1 was at 30% in 1999.  Division 3 was at 36.36% in 1999.  The reversal rate of Division 4 was 37.5% in 1997.

The three-year floating averages were a bit more consistent from 2000 to 2009.  Division 1 had a three- year dip from 2007 to 2009 – 28.57% (2007), 12.5% (2008) and 25% (2009).  Division 2 fell to 28.57% in 2004 and one-third for the next two years.  Division 4 rose to 83.33% in 2004 and 80% the following year.  Division 5 was 80% in 2007 and 75% in the following year.  Division 6 dipped to 16.67% in 2006 and 27.27% in 2007.

The reversal rates became a bit more unstable over the past decade.  Division 1’s rate was at only 27.27% in 2010 before jumping to 100% in 2013 and 2014.  Division 2’s reversal rate was quite high early in the decade: 83.33% in 2010, 80% in 2011, 90% in 2012 and 2013, 100% in 2014 and 80% in 2014.  Division 3 was quite high at the beginning and end of the decade: 87.5% in 2010, 80% in 2018 and 2019.  Division 4 has fared well in the past decade for the most part – 33.33% in 2010 and 2019, 25% in 2011 and 30% in 2012.  Division 4’s highest rate was 71.43% in 2014.  Division 5’s reversal rate was 80% in 2011 and 2012 before falling to one-third in 2014 and 28.57% in 2015.  Division 6’s reversal rate reached 76.92% in 2012, 72.73% in 2014, 75% in 2015 and 80% in 2016.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the data for the Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Districts.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Adam Jones (no changes).

What Kinds of Criminal Cases Did Cook County Send to the Supreme Court, 2005-2019?

Yesterday, we reviewed the areas of law involved in the criminal cases from Cook county – the only county in the First Appellate District – from 1990 to 2004.  Today, we’re reviewing the numbers for the years 2005 to 2019.

The Court decided seven criminal procedure cases from Cook county in 2005, three cases each in constitutional law, habeas and juvenile issues, two cases involving sexual offenses and one involving violent crimes.  In 2006, the Court decided nine criminal procedure cases, seven on constitutional law, and one case each in habeas corpus, juvenile issues, sentencing and violent crimes.  In 2007, the Court decided five cases in constitutional law, four in criminal procedure and habeas corpus, and one each involving the death penalty and sentencing law.  In 2008, the Court decided seven constitutional law cases, four each in criminal procedure and sentencing, two about juvenile law issues, and one each regarding the death penalty and habeas corpus.  In 2009, the Court decided sixteen criminal procedure cases from Cook county, three cases involving constitutional law, two involving habeas corpus and sentencing law and one each involving sexual offenses, juvenile law issues and the death penalty.

The Supreme Court decided nine criminal procedure cases from Cook county in 2010, six habeas corpus cases, two each in constitutional law and sentencing, and one each involving the death penalty, juvenile issues and political offenses.  In 2011, the Court decided nine sentencing cases, eight criminal procedure cases, three cases each about property crimes and violent crimes, two habeas corpus cases and one case involving sexual offenses.  In 2012, the Court decided four constitutional law cases, three criminal procedure cases and two cases each in habeas corpus, sexual offenses and violent crimes.  In 2013, the Court decided eight criminal procedure cases, five constitutional law cases, three habeas cases, two sentencing cases and one case each relating to drug offenses, juvenile issues and property crimes.  In 2014, there were three constitutional law cases, two cases each in criminal procedure, habeas and sexual offenses, and one each involving juvenile issues and mental health issues.

The Court decided seven constitutional law cases in 2015, three criminal procedure, two sentencing, two involving violent crimes, and one each involving habeas corpus and juvenile issues.  The following year, the Court decided five criminal procedure cases, three cases involving habeas corpus and sentencing, two involving constitutional law and violent crimes, and one involving juvenile issues.  In 2017, the Court decided seven constitutional law cases, four involving juvenile issues, three in criminal procedure and one each involving drug offenses, mental health issues and property crimes.  In 2018, the Court decided three criminal procedure cases and one case each in constitutional law, sentencing and violent crimes.  In 2019, the Court has decided two constitutional law cases from Cook county.

Finally, we review what share of the total criminal docket from 1990 to 2019 (to date) was accounted for by each area of law.  Four areas are in double digits: criminal procedure (22.27%), constitutional law (21.81%), the death penalty (17.29%) and habeas corpus (15.73%).  Following those areas were sentencing (7.94%), juvenile issues (5.14%) and violent crimes (4.83%).

Join us back here next week as we turn our attention to a new issue in our examination of the Court’s decision making.

Image courtesy of Flickr by David Wilson (no changes).

What Kinds of Criminal Cases Did Cook County Send to the Supreme Court, 1990-2004?

Last week, we reviewed the areas of law involved in the Supreme Court’s Cook county civil cases.  Today and tomorrow, we’re reviewing the criminal data.

In 1990, the Court decided a dozen death penalty cases from Cook county, six constitutional and six criminal procedure cases, one habeas corpus case and one involving property crimes (e.g., burglary, theft, embezzlement, etc.).  In 1991, the Court decided nine criminal procedure cases, seven death penalty cases, two cases each in constitutional law and habeas corpus, and one each regarding juvenile issues, sexual offenses and violent crimes.  In 1992, the Court decided thirteen death penalty cases, seven constitutional law cases, six sentencing cases, five cases each in habeas corpus and violent crimes, four regarding criminal procedure and one involving driving offenses.  In 1993, there were nine death penalty cases, six constitutional law cases, three cases in criminal procedure, and one each involving driving offenses and juvenile issues.  In 1994, the Court decided nine cases each in constitutional law and death penalty law, five involving criminal procedure, three about habeas corpus, and one each involving sentencing and violent crimes.

The Court decided nine death penalty cases from Cook county in 1995.  The Court decided seven cases each in constitutional law and habeas, five involving violent crimes, three on criminal procedure, two on juvenile issues and one involving drug offenses.  In 1996, the Court decided ten death penalty cases, three on habeas, two each on constitutional law, criminal procedure, sentencing and violent crimes, and one each involving drug offenses and juvenile issues.  In 1997, the Court decided six cases each on the death penalty and habeas corpus, four on criminal procedure, three each on constitutional law and sentencing, two involving juvenile issues and one about violent crimes.  The following year, the Court decided a dozen death penalty cases from Cook county, six cases each on constitutional law and habeas corpus, two cases on sentencing law and one each on criminal procedure and violent crimes.  In 1999, the Court decided five cases in criminal procedure and habeas, four involving the death penalty, three on constitutional law and one each on property crimes and sentencing law.

The Court decided sixteen habeas cases from Cook County in 2000, nine death penalty cases, three constitutional law cases, two each in criminal procedure and juvenile issues and one apiece relating to property crimes, sentencing law and violent crimes.  In 2001, there were four cases on habeas corpus, three each in constitutional law and death penalty law, two about criminal procedure and sentencing law and one about juvenile issues.  In 2002, the Court decided nine habeas cases, six in criminal procedure, four about constitutional law, three about juvenile issues, two sentencing law cases and one each involving a death penalty and sexual offenses.  In 2003, the Court decided fifteen constitutional law cases, five in criminal procedure, two involving the death penalty and one each in habeas corpus, juvenile issues, sentencing law, sexual offenses and violent crimes.  In 2004, the Court decided six constitutional law cases, three each in habeas corpus and juvenile issues, two in criminal procedure and mental health issues and one in sentencing and violent crimes.

Join us back here tomorrow as we address the data for the years 2005 to 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Ken Lund (no changes).

What Kinds of Civil Cases Did Cook County Send to the Supreme Court, 2005-2019?

Last time, we reviewed the data on which areas of law were involved in the civil cases originating in Cook County which the Supreme Court decided from 1990 to 2004.  This time, we’re looking at the years 2005 to 2019.

In 2005, the Supreme Court decided five constitutional law and five government/administrative law cases which originated in Cook County.  There were four civil procedure cases, three tort and workers comp cases, two cases each in insurance law and tax law and one involving consumer law.  In 2006, the Court decided six tort cases, four government/administrative law cases, three constitutional and insurance law cases, two cases involving commercial law and one each in civil procedure, employment law and workers comp.  In 2007, the Court decided six tort cases, three civil procedure cases, two cases each in constitutional law, insurance law and workers compensation and one apiece in consumer and tax law.  In 2008, the Court decided nine tort cases, two tax law cases and one case each in five areas: civil procedure, constitutional law, contract law, election law and property law.  In 2009, the Court decided two cases each in four areas: constitutional law, government/administrative law, tax law and wills & estates.  The Court decided one case each in civil procedure, election law, employment law, insurance law and tort law.

In 2010, the Court decided five civil cases from Cook county in constitutional law and tort law, two each about civil procedure, government and administrative law, insurance and tax law, and one dealing with contract law, domestic relations, election law and secured transactions.  In 2011, there were three cases in domestic relations, government/administrative and tort law, and one apiece in civil procedure, constitutional law, election law, employment law, insurance and tax law.  In 2012, there were seven civil procedure cases, four in government and administrative law, three about tort law, two in domestic relations and one each in constitutional law, election law and wills & estates.  In 2013, the Court decided four cases involving government and administrative law, three in tort law, two in constitutional law and one each in civil procedure, tax, wills and estates and workers comp.  In 2014, there were four tort cases, three in government/administrative law, two about constitutional law and one each in civil procedure and domestic relations.

In 2015, the Court decided four tort cases, three civil procedure cases, two in constitutional law and government/administrative, and one each in six different areas: domestic relations, environmental law, insurance law, property law, secured transactions and workers compensation.  In 2016, the Court decided five civil constitutional law cases, four government, four tort and one each in domestic relations, property law and workers compensation.  In 2017, the Court decided five government cases, four tort, two constitutional law and one each in domestic relations and tax law.  Last year, there were four civil procedure cases, three in government and administrative law, two each about constitutional law and insurance law and one each in construction law and tort law.  So far in 2019, there have been two cases each in civil procedure, constitutional law and government/administrative and one each in property law and tax law.

Below we report the share of the total civil cases from Cook county for each area of the law.  Only four areas are in double digits – tort 27.02%, civil procedure 15.86%, constitutional law 14.4% and government and administrative law 12.78%.  After that, there’s a steep drop off to insurance law at 6.47%, domestic relations 3.4% and workers comp 3.24%.

Join us here next week as we look at Cook’s criminal cases decided by the Supreme Court.

Image courtesy of Flickr by HystericalMark (no changes).

What Kinds of Cases Did Cook County Send to the Supreme Court, 1990-2004?

Last week, we reviewed the data on which counties accounted for the Supreme Court’s death penalty cases between 1990 and the final case before abolition in 2010.  This week, we’re looking at the Cook county docket – what areas of law did the Cook county cases fall in?

In 1990, the Court decided ten tort cases from Cook county, ten civil procedure cases, five constitutional law cases, three commercial law and government/administrative law cases and one case each in contract law, domestic relations, election law, insurance law and workers compensation.  IN 1991, the Court decided eight tort law cases, three civil procedure cases, two cases each in constitutional law, contract and insurance law, and one case each in arbitration, commercial law, corporate law, domestic relations and wills and estates.  In 1992, the Court decided nine cases in tort law, six in constitutional and government law, five in civil procedure, three in insurance law, two in consumer law and one each in arbitration, commercial law, election law and employment law.  In 1993, the Court decided six tort cases, five civil procedure cases, three insurance law cases, two constitutional law cases and one case each in commercial law, insurance law, wills and estates and workers compensation.  In 1994, the Court decided eight cases each in civil procedure and tort law, six cases in constitutional law, three in government law, two each in domestic relations, insurance law and tax law and one property law case.

In 1995, the Court decided nine tort cases, seven civil procedure cases, two insurance and workers compensation cases and one case each in contract law, environmental law, government law, property law and wills and estates.  In 1996, the Court decided nine tort law cases, seven constitutional law cases and one case each in civil procedure, commercial law, contract law, domestic relations, employment law, property law and tax law.  In 1997, the Court decided a dozen tort cases, six civil procedure cases, five insurance law cases, two constitutional law cases and one case each in arbitration, commercial law, contract law, employment law, government law and property law.  In 1998, the Court decided ten tort cases, five civil procedure cases, four constitutional law cases, two cases in arbitration, employment law, government law and workers compensation.  Finally, the Court decided one contract law case and one tax law case.  In 1999, the Court decided six tor cases, three constitutional law cases, two cases each in civil procedure, government law and workers compensation and one each in employment law, insurance, property law and wills & estates.

In 2000, the Court decided four cases each in civil procedure and tort law, three in government law, two in insurance law and one case each in constitutional law, contract law, domestic relations, property law, tax and workers comp.  In 2001, the Court decided seven civil procedure cases from Cook county, four in constitutional law, three each in property law and tort, two each in employment law and insurance law and one case in arbitration, consumer law and government law.  In 2002, the Court decided six tort cases from Cook county, five government/administrative law cases, three civil procedure, two constitutional law and one case each in domestic relations, employment relations, insurance law, property law, wills and estates and workers compensation.  In 2003, the Court decided four con law cases, three each in domestic relations, government law, insurance and tort and one secured transactions case.  In 2004, the Court decided eight tort cases, four constitutional law cases, three government law cases, two in arbitration and contract law and one case each in civil procedure, domestic relations, insurance law and workers comp.

Join us back here tomorrow as we review the Court’s Cook county civil cases for the years 2005 to 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Prayitno (no changes).

Where Did Illinois’ Death Penalty Cases Originate Before Abolition, 2001-2010?

Last time, we reviewed the data tracking the incidence of Illinois’ death penalty cases between 1990 and 2000.  In this post, we’re looking at the final years of Illinois’ death penalty, from 2001 to the Court’s last death penalty case in 2010.

Between 1990 and 2000, Cook County dominated the death penalty docket.  By 2001, the number of cases from Cook County had slowed dramatically.  Cook County accounted for three death penalty cases in 2001, one in 2002, two in 2003 and one in 2004.  No other county accounted for more than one per year.  Du Page county produced one case a year in 2001, 2002 and 2003 and Kane County produced one case in 2001 and one in 2002.  Other than that, seven additional counties produced one case each across these five years.

 

During the final years of the death penalty, Cook county accounted for one case per year in 2007, 2008 and 2009 and two in 2010.  Du Page county produced one in 2009 and one in 2010.  Hancock county had one case in 2010.  Livingston county had one case in 2007.  St. Clair county had its final case in 2006, Stark county had one in 2006 and Will county had its final case in 2009.

In our final table, we compare, for each county that produced at least one death penalty case, its share of the total population of death penalty counties to its share of the total docket of death penalty cases between 1990 and 2010.  What we see is how much Illinois’ death penalty was driven by very small counties.  Cook county has 48.98% of the population of all the death penalty counties and 54.46% of the total cases.  But aside from Cook county, only eleven counties which have more than one percent of the death penalty counties’ population produced any cases at all: Du Page (8.78% of population); Lake (6.63%); Will (6.55%); Kane (5.05%); Winnebago (2.69%); Madison (2.5%); St. Clair (2.47%); Champaign (1.99%); Peoria (1.71%); Rock Island (1.36%) and Kanakakee (1.04%).  And to be clear – these aren’t percentages of total population of the state – they are each county’s share of the total population of the thirty-eight counties which sent at least one death penalty case to the Supreme Court from 1990 to 2010.  Illinois has 102 counties in all.

Join us back here later in the week as we take a closer look at the kinds of cases Cook county sent to the Supreme Court between 1990 and 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by James Jordan (no changes).

Where Did Illinois’ Death Penalty Cases Originate Before Abolition, 1990-2000?

As our examination of the geography of the Court’s docket continues, this post and next we’ll be looking at which counties accounted for the Court’s death penalty cases prior to abolition in July 2011.

Not surprisingly, Cook County accounted for the vast majority of the death sentences reviewed by the Court: twelve in 1990, six in 1991, twelve in 1992 and nine per year in 1993, 1994 and 1995.  The only other counties which accounted for more than one death case in any single year were Du Page county (two in 1995), Stephenson county (two in 1995) and Williamson county (two in 1995).

The pattern was similar between 1996 and 2000.  Cook county accounted for ten death cases in 1996, six in 1997, twelve in 1998, four in 1999 and nine in 2000.  Du Page county had two decided in 2000, Henry county had two in 1997 and Lake county had two in 1997.  Other than that, no county produced more than one case in any single year.

Join us back here next time as we review the data for the years 2001 to 2010.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Ben Seidelman (no changes).

Which Boards, Commissions and Agencies Accounted for the Supreme Court’s Administrative Law Decisions, 2005-2019?

In 2005, the Supreme Court decided four cases which originated in the Industrial Commission (renamed, effective January 1, 2005, as the Illinois Workers Compensation Commission.  The Court decided six one-off administrative law cases, originating at the Board of Trustees of the Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund, the state Department of Employment Security, the Secretary of State, the state Labor Relations Board, the Rockford County Board of Education and the Board of Trustees of the Matteson Police Pension Fund.  In 2006, the Court decided three workers compensation cases and single cases from the Chicago Heights Police Pension Board, the Chicago Department of Planning and Development, the state Board Elections, the Illinois Department of Human Services and the state Department of Public Health.

In 2007, the Court decided four cases from the Board of Election Commissions of the City of Chicago and one each from the City of North Chicago Police Pension Board, the Industrial Commission, the Labor Relations Board, the Motor Vehicle Review Board, and Municipal Retirement Fund and the Illinois Pollution Control Board.  In 2008, the Court decided one case each from the state Commerce Commission, the Illinois Department of Public Aid, the state Labor Relations Board, the State Board of Education and the Village of Stickney Municipal Officers Electoral Board.  In 2009, the Court decided one case apiece from the Roselle Police Pension Board, the Public Access Counselor of the Illinois Attorney General, the state Board of Elections, the Illinois Department of Revenue, the Illinois Department of Transportation, the state Human Rights Commission and the Industrial Commission.

In 2010, the Supreme Court decided two cases from the Illinois Department of Revenue, one from the state Board of Education, one from the Industrial Commission and one from the Board of Trustees of the General Assembly Retirement System.  In 2011, the Court decided nine single cases from nine different administrative entities: the Chicago Board of Election Commissioners; the Board of Review of the Illinois Department of Employment Security; the City of Country Club Hills Police Pension Board; the Cook County Employee Appeals Board; the Cook County Collector; the state Board of Elections; the Illinois Department of Revenue; the state Educational Labor Relations Board; and the Illinois Pollution Control Board.  In 2012, the Court decided two cases originating at the Orland Fire Protection District’s Board of Trustees and one each from the Chicago Department of Transportation, the Cook County Board of Election Commissioners, the state Department of Professional Regulation, the state Environmental Protection Agency and the St. Clair County Electoral Board.

In 2013, the Court decided two cases from the Illinois Department of Revenue and two from the Industrial Commission, and one each from the Cook County Commission on Human Rights, the Illinois Educational Labor Relations Board, the Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund, the Illinois Pollution Control Board and the Retirement Board of the Firemen’s Annuity and Retirement Benefit Fund of Chicago.  In 2014, the Supreme Court decided one case each from the Education Officers Electoral Board; the Illinois Commerce Commission; the Illinois Department of Public Health; the Illinois Liquor Control Commission; the Kendall County Freedom of Information Act Officer; and the Retirement Board of the Policemen’s Annuity and Benefit Fund of Chicago.

In 2015, the Supreme Court decided one case each from the Board of Trustees of the Vernon Hills Police Pension Fund; the East St. Louis Board of Election Commissioners; the Illinois Commerce Commission; the Illinois Department of Public Health; the Illinois Educational Labor Relations Board and the Industrial Commission.  In 2016, the Court decided only one administrative case, which originated in the Illinois Commerce Commission.  In 2017, the Court decided seven one-offs in administrative law originating in the office of the Illinois Attorney General; the Bartonville Board of Fire and Police Commissioners; the Champaign County Board of Review; the Chicago Department of Administrative Hearings; the Department of Children and Family Services; the state Commerce Commission and the Illinois High School Association. 

The Court decided no civil administrative law cases in 2018.  So far in 2019, the Court has decided two such cases, one each from the Illinois Pollution Control Board and the Secretary of State.

Join us back here later this week as we take a look at the Court’s death penalty cases from 1990 to abolition of the death penalty in 2011.

Image courtesy of Flickr by Marco Verch (no changes).

 

Which Boards, Commissions and Agencies Accounted for the Supreme Court’s Administrative Law Decisions, 1990-2004?

For the past eight weeks, we’ve been reviewing the data for which Circuit Courts accounted for each Appellate Court District’s Supreme Court cases from 1990 to 2019 (so far).  This week, we’re reviewing the data on administrative boards, commissions and agencies.

In 1990, the Supreme Court decided three cases which originated at the ARDC Review Board and two from the State Labor Relations Board.  All the other administrative cases that year were one-offs, including the Chicago Police Board, the Illinois Commerce Commission, Department of Revenue, Industrial Commission and Pollution Control Board, the Secretary of State’s office and the Tazewell County Board.  In 1991, the Court decided two cases from the Commerce Commission six one-offs, including the Department of Employment Security, the Department of Professional Regulation, the Industrial Commission and the Redistricting Commission.

In 1992, the Court decided three cases from the Illinois Department of Professional Regulation, two from the ARDC Review Board and two from the Educational Labor Relations Board.  The eight agencies contributing one case each included the Champaign County Code Enforcement Board, the Cook County Officers Electoral Board, the state Commerce Commission, Pollution Control Board and Redistricting Commission and the State Labor Relations Board.  In 1993, there were only two administrative cases – one from the Chicago Police Board and one from the state Pollution Control Board.  In 1994, the Court decided two cases which originated in the Industrial Commission and five other singles, including the Cook County Officers Electoral Board, the state Commerce Commission, the state Department of Human Rights, the Department of Revenue and the state Pollution Control Board.

In 1995, the Supreme Court decided two cases each from the Illinois Industrial Commission and the Human Rights Commission.  The five remaining administrative cases included the Cook County Board of Commissioners, the Downers Grove Fire Department and the Illinois Department of Professional Regulation.  In 1996, the Court decided three cases from the Industrial Commission, two from the state Human Rights Commission, and five additional cases from administrative entities such as the Department of Central Management Services, the Department of Public Aid, the state Prison Review Board and the state Fire Marshal.

In 1997, the Court decided two cases from the Illinois State Labor Relations Board and six additional cases, including the Illinois Civil Service Commission, the Human Rights Commission, the state Racing Board ad the Madison County Officers Electoral Board.  In 1998, the Court decided three cases from the Illinois Department of Revenue and three from the Industrial Commission.  The Court decided five single cases originating from administrative entities such as the Illinois Commerce Commission, the Department of Natural Resources, the State Labor Relations Board and the Jackson County Merit Commission.  In 1999, all five administrative cases were one-offs, originating in the Adams County Sheriff’s Merit Commission, the Du Page County Tax Collector, the East St. Louis Financial Advisory Authority, the state Board of Elections and the Department of Revenue.

In 2000, the Court decided three cases from the Industrial Commission and one each from the state Department of Natural Resources, the Illinois Pollution Control Board and the Monroe County Election Canvassing Board.  In 2001, the Court decided only two administrative law cases, one originating in the Chicago City Council and one with the Industrial Commission.  There were four in 2002 – two from the Industrial Commission, one from the Illinois Health Facilities Planning Board and one from the state Department of Employment Security.  The Court decided two more Industrial Commission cases in 2003 and five singles, including the Board of Trustees of the Judges’ Retirement System, the Cook County Civil Service Commission, the state Department of Professional Regulation, the state Board of Education and the Olympia Fields Board of Trustees.  In 2004, the Court decided two more cases from the Industrial Commission six singles, including cases from the Executive Committee of the State Universities Retirement System, the Illinois Commerce Commission, the Department of Children and Family Services, the Department of Revenue, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, and the City of Braidwood’s Municipal Officers Electoral Board.

Effective January 1, 2005, the Illinois Industrial Commission was renamed (technically, it was shut down and replaced, but given that the two Commissions’ jurisdiction was pretty much identical, “renamed” seems more appropriate) the Illinois Workers Compensation Commission.  However, to facilitate comparison between this post and the next one, we’ll keep the name of the Industrial Commission as we total up the workers comp cases during the second half of our period.

Join us back here next time as we review the data for the years 2005 through 2019.

Image courtesy of Flickr by David Brossard (no changes).

 

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