Archives: Time under Submission

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Does the Time to Argument and Decision Correlate to How a Criminal Case is Decided?

Last time, we looked at whether the Court’s lag time – from the allowance of a petition for leave to appeal to oral argument, and from oral argument to decision – gives litigants a hint of what the Court’s decision is likely to be.  We showed that although there’s no consistent relationship between lag time … Continue Reading

Does the Time to Argument and Decision Correlate to How a Civil Case is Decided?

Last week, we reviewed the basic data on lag times at the Court – how long has it typically taken, year after year, for civil and criminal cases to be argued and decided.  This week, we’re looking at a different aspect of lag time – does it help predict the likely result?  Is a case … Continue Reading

How Long Do Criminal Cases Typically Take to Argument and Decision?

Last time, we reviewed the lag time data for the Court’s civil cases between 2005 and 2017 – specifically, (1) grant of petition for leave to appeal to oral argument; and (2) oral argument to decision.  This time, we’re looking at the Court’s experience with its criminal docket. Once again, we have only the argument-to-decision … Continue Reading

How Long Do Civil Cases Typically Take to Argument and Decision?

Last time, we were reviewing the Court’s treatment of cases with a dissent at the Appellate Court.  This week, we’re reviewing the data on lag times at the Court. In 2014, a joint project of the Court Management Committee of the Conference of Chief Justices and the Conference of State Court Administrators, in conjunction with … Continue Reading

Is There a Stable Relationship Between Time Under Submission and Result in Criminal Cases?

Yesterday, we studied whether there’s a constant relationship, year after year, between the ultimate result in civil cases and the lag time to a decision – the number of days from allowance of the PLA to oral argument, and from argument to decision. Today, we review the year-by-year data for the criminal docket. Between 2010 … Continue Reading

Is There a Stable Relationship Between Time Under Submission and Result in Civil Cases?

Last week, we showed that in contrast to the data for the California Supreme Court, time under submission from the allowing of the petition for leave to appeal to oral argument and argument to decision was longer at the Illinois Supreme Court for reversals than for affirmances. In those posts, we looked at the data … Continue Reading

Is There a Correlation Between the Time Under Submission and the Result in Criminal Cases (2010-2016)?

Yesterday, we demonstrated that while affirmances generally are pending longer in California from grant of review to argument to decision, the evidence is more equivocal in Illinois, at least on the civil side.  Today, we look at the criminal side of the docket.  So, does there appear to be any correlation between the final result … Continue Reading

Is There a Correlation Between the Time Under Submission and the Result in Civil Cases (2010-2016)?

Last week, we looked at the average time under submission at the Illinois Supreme Court from allowance of the petition for leave to appeal to oral argument to decision.  Over at the California Supreme Court, we’ve shown that affirmances generally take longer at each step of the way than reversals do.  So is there a … Continue Reading

How Long Do Criminal Cases at the Illinois Supreme Court Remain Pending?

Yesterday, we began our review of lag times at the Illinois Supreme Court with a review of the Court’s civil cases from 2010 to 2016.  Today, we turn our attention to the Court’s criminal cases. We have grant-to-oral argument date for 243 criminal cases, and oral argument-to-decision data for 270 cases.  The mean time in … Continue Reading

Are Sharply Divided Criminal Cases Under Submission for Longer Than Lopsided Cases?

Yesterday, we continued our analysis of the Illinois Supreme Court’s time under submission from 2008 to the end of 2015, looking at whether unanimous decisions are generally under submission for substantially less time than non-unanimous ones.  Today, we address the year-by-year data for the criminal docket.  The numbers demonstrate that although, all things being equal, … Continue Reading

What Can We Predict From the Time a Criminal Case Has Been Under Submission?

Last week, we began our examination of the Illinois Supreme Court’s lag time on civil cases in unanimous and non-unanimous cases.  This week, we turn to the Court’s criminal, quasi-criminal, juvenile and disciplinary cases. Interestingly, criminal cases are under submission for less time, on average, for nearly every year since 2000 than the comparable numbers … Continue Reading

Are Sharply Divided Cases Under Submission for Longer Than Lopsided Cases?

Yesterday, we began our analysis of the average time under submission at the Illinois Supreme Court for civil cases.  Today, we probe further the question of what can be predicted from time under submission by considering the year-by-year data. In Table 237 below, we report the lag times for divided and unanimous civil decisions at … Continue Reading

What Can We Predict From the Time a Case Has Been Under Submission?

Today we turn to another phase of our analysis of the Illinois Supreme Court’s decision making, asking what we can predict from the time a case has been under submission between oral argument and decision. In Table 235, we report the overall data for civil cases.  The lag time at the Court has been consistently … Continue Reading

What Can We Tell From the Time a Case Has Been Under Submission (Part II)?

Yesterday, we turned from examining the sources of the Court’s docket to looking at what the data tells us about the Court’s decision-making process. There, we determined that the Court’s overall lag time has been relatively constant for at least ten years. When the Court hands down a decision in three to four months, the … Continue Reading

What Can We Tell From the Time a Case Has Been Under Submission (Part I)?

For the past several weeks, we’ve been investigating what the data tells us about how the Illinois Supreme Court assembles its docket: whether the Court prefers final judgments; how often the Court takes up summary judgments; what counties and areas of the law have contributed most to the Court’s civil docket; whether a dissent at … Continue Reading
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