Archives: Illinois Supreme Court

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What Kind of Criminal Sentencing Law Case is the Court Most Likely to Hear?

Yesterday, we took a close look at the Court’s history with civil cases involving governmental parties and administrative law.  Today, we’re on the criminal law side of the docket, reviewing the Court’s experience with cases involving criminal sentencing. Since 1990, the Court has taken a virtually equal number of sentencing cases won by each side … Continue Reading

What Kind of Government and Administrative Law Case Is the Court Most Likely to Hear?

Last week, we reviewed the Court’s history since 1990 with civil cases involving governmental parties and administrative law, and criminal cases involving the law of sentencing.  This week, we’re digging deeper, looking at three questions: (1) does the Court tend to take more cases in each area won by one side or the other below; … Continue Reading

How Many Cases Has the Court Decided a Year Involving the Law of Criminal Sentencing?

Yesterday, we reviewed the Court’s record with civil cases involving government entities and administrative law.  Today, we’re looking at the criminal side of the docket – specifically, cases involving sentencing law. The Court decided five sentencing law cases in 1990, one in 1991, eleven in 1992, one in 1993, three in 1994, six in 1995 … Continue Reading

How Many Government and Administrative Law Cases Has the Court Decided a Year?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been studying the Court’s death penalty cases.  This week, we’re turning our attention to a new topic – (1) government and administrative law; and (2) sentencing law in the criminal docket.  First up is civil cases involving government parties and administrative law issues.  Since 1990, the Supreme Court has … Continue Reading

Adjusted for Population, How Do the Illinois and California Supreme Courts Compare With Respect to Their Death Penalty Caseloads?

Yesterday, we compared the Illinois and California Supreme Court’s death penalty caseloads between 1992, the beginning of our California data, through 2010, when Illinois abolished the death penalty.  We found that in the years prior to Governor George Ryan’s 2010 moratorium on executions, Illinois both averaged more death penalty cases per year and was more … Continue Reading

How Do the Illinois and California Supreme Courts Compare With Respect to Death Penalty Judgments?

[The posts for today and tomorrow will be cross-posted, in slightly revised form, in the California Supreme Court Review.] For the past two weeks, we’ve been taking a detailed look at the death penalty jurisprudence of the Illinois and California Supreme Courts here and at our sister blog the California Supreme Court Review.  This week, … Continue Reading

How Often Did the Court Reverse, in Whole or in Part, Death Penalty Judgments?

Yesterday, we took an in-depth look at the Court’s tort law caseload.  We showed that the Court has both accepted for review a larger share of plaintiffs’ wins from the Appellate Court than defense wins, and has reversed those plaintiffs’ wins more often.  Today, we’re taking another look at the Court’s death penalty cases. Overall, … Continue Reading

What Kind of Tort Law Case is the Court Most Likely to Hear?

Last week, we reviewed the year-by-year data for the Court’s tort law caseload.  This week, we’re answering our usual second week questions: (1) did the Court decide more defense or plaintiffs’ wins; (2) did the Court reverse either side’s wins at a higher rate; and (3) how often did the Court reverse tort decisions, either … Continue Reading

How Many Death Penalty Cases Did the Court Decide a Year?

Yesterday, we reviewed the Court’s year by year caseload of tort cases.  Today, we’re looking at the Court’s death penalty cases. The Court decided fifteen death penalty cases in 1990, thirteen cases in 1991, twenty-three cases in 1992, thirteen cases in 1993, seventeen cases in 1994, eighteen cases in 1995 and twenty cases in 1996. … Continue Reading

How Many Tort Cases Does the Court Decide a Year?

For the past two weeks, we’ve taken a close look at the Court’s experience with civil and criminal procedure cases (both here and at our sister blog, the California Supreme Court Review.)  This week, we’re reviewing the Court’s tort cases and death penalty decisions. For the entire period from 1990 to 2017, the Court has … Continue Reading

What Kind of Criminal Procedure Case is the Court Most Likely to Hear?

Yesterday, we took a detailed look at the Court’s civil procedure decisions.  Today, we’re taking a look at the Court’s criminal procedure cases. In 1990, the Court affirmed 6 prosecution wins in criminal procedure cases.  The Court affirmed 3 times in 1991, twice in 1993 and 1994, 1 time in 1995, 2 in 1996, five … Continue Reading

What Kind of Civil Procedure Case is the Court Most Likely to Hear?

Last week, we tracked the Supreme Court’s year-by-year record with civil and criminal procedure cases.  This week, we’re taking a deeper look to address several questions: (1) did the Court tend to take more defendants’ or plaintiffs’ wins from the Appellate Court? (2) did the Court reverse either defense or plaintiffs’ wins at a higher … Continue Reading

How Many Criminal Procedure Cases Does the Court Decide a Year?

Yesterday, we began our analysis of the Court’s procedural cases with a review of the year-by-year data on the Court’s civil procedure cases.  Today, we’re looking at the Court’s criminal procedure cases.  For the entire period 1990-2017, the Court has decided a total of 307 cases whose primary issue involved criminal procedure. The Court decided … Continue Reading

How Many Civil Procedure Cases Does the Court Decide a Year?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been taking a detailed look at the Court’s constitutional law decisions, both on the civil and criminal sides of the docket.  This week and next, we’ll be looking at the Court’s procedure cases – decisions that turn on civil and criminal procedure issues.  So first – how many civil … Continue Reading

What Kind of Constitutional Law Case is the Court Most Likely to Hear in the Criminal Docket?

This week, we’re continuing our review of the Court’s constitutional law docket by asking (1) how much of the Court’s docket consists of cases won below by one side or the other; (2) whether the Court has a significantly higher (or lower) reversal rate depending on who won below; and (3) whether the Court tends … Continue Reading

What Kind of Constitutional Law Case is the Court Most Likely to Hear in the Civil Docket?

Last week, we tracked the number of constitutional law cases on the civil side of the Court’s docket, year by year since 1990.  This week, we’re looking deeper at the data.  What kind of constitutional law cases has the Court tended to take, and has the Court tended to reverse more regularly, depending on who … Continue Reading

Constitutional Law at the Court, Part 2 – How Many Criminal Con Law Cases Does the Court Decide a Year?

Yesterday, we began our detailed look at the most common area of law on the Court’s civil and criminal dockets (and the area of law most frequently identified with courts of law resort) – constitutional law.  Today, we’re beginning our review of the Court’s constitutional law cases on the criminal docket side. In 1990, the … Continue Reading

Constitutional Law at the Court, Part 1 – How Many Civil Con Law Cases Does the Court Decide a Year?

This week, we’re beginning an intensive look at the Court’s cases, divided by subject matter.  Many people – especially non-lawyers – think of courts of last resort primarily in terms of constitutional law decisions.  So let’s start there – the Illinois Supreme Court’s past twenty-seven years with constitutional law in both civil and criminal law. … Continue Reading

Does the Time to Argument and Decision Correlate to How a Criminal Case is Decided?

Last time, we looked at whether the Court’s lag time – from the allowance of a petition for leave to appeal to oral argument, and from oral argument to decision – gives litigants a hint of what the Court’s decision is likely to be.  We showed that although there’s no consistent relationship between lag time … Continue Reading

Does the Time to Argument and Decision Correlate to How a Civil Case is Decided?

Last week, we reviewed the basic data on lag times at the Court – how long has it typically taken, year after year, for civil and criminal cases to be argued and decided.  This week, we’re looking at a different aspect of lag time – does it help predict the likely result?  Is a case … Continue Reading

How Long Do Criminal Cases Typically Take to Argument and Decision?

Last time, we reviewed the lag time data for the Court’s civil cases between 2005 and 2017 – specifically, (1) grant of petition for leave to appeal to oral argument; and (2) oral argument to decision.  This time, we’re looking at the Court’s experience with its criminal docket. Once again, we have only the argument-to-decision … Continue Reading

How Long Do Civil Cases Typically Take to Argument and Decision?

Last time, we were reviewing the Court’s treatment of cases with a dissent at the Appellate Court.  This week, we’re reviewing the data on lag times at the Court. In 2014, a joint project of the Court Management Committee of the Conference of Chief Justices and the Conference of State Court Administrators, in conjunction with … Continue Reading

Are Criminal Cases With a Dissent More Often Reversed?

Yesterday, we began our further examination of the Court’s experience with cases with a dissent at the Appellate Court.  We asked whether civil cases with a dissent were systematically more or less likely to be reversed than cases which were decided unanimously.  Today, we’re asking the same question on the criminal side of the docket. … Continue Reading

Are Civil Cases With a Dissent More Frequently Reversed?

Last week, we reviewed the data on whether cases which were published below are more frequently reversed.  This week, we’re reviewing a related issue: are cases with a dissent below more frequently reversed by the Supreme Court?  If so, that might suggest that dissents at the Appellate Court aren’t just helpful in getting the Court’s … Continue Reading
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