Archives: Illinois Supreme Court

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What Kind of Constitutional Law Case is the Court Most Likely to Hear in the Criminal Docket?

This week, we’re continuing our review of the Court’s constitutional law docket by asking (1) how much of the Court’s docket consists of cases won below by one side or the other; (2) whether the Court has a significantly higher (or lower) reversal rate depending on who won below; and (3) whether the Court tends … Continue Reading

What Kind of Constitutional Law Case is the Court Most Likely to Hear in the Civil Docket?

Last week, we tracked the number of constitutional law cases on the civil side of the Court’s docket, year by year since 1990.  This week, we’re looking deeper at the data.  What kind of constitutional law cases has the Court tended to take, and has the Court tended to reverse more regularly, depending on who … Continue Reading

Constitutional Law at the Court, Part 2 – How Many Criminal Con Law Cases Does the Court Decide a Year?

Yesterday, we began our detailed look at the most common area of law on the Court’s civil and criminal dockets (and the area of law most frequently identified with courts of law resort) – constitutional law.  Today, we’re beginning our review of the Court’s constitutional law cases on the criminal docket side. In 1990, the … Continue Reading

Constitutional Law at the Court, Part 1 – How Many Civil Con Law Cases Does the Court Decide a Year?

This week, we’re beginning an intensive look at the Court’s cases, divided by subject matter.  Many people – especially non-lawyers – think of courts of last resort primarily in terms of constitutional law decisions.  So let’s start there – the Illinois Supreme Court’s past twenty-seven years with constitutional law in both civil and criminal law. … Continue Reading

Does the Time to Argument and Decision Correlate to How a Criminal Case is Decided?

Last time, we looked at whether the Court’s lag time – from the allowance of a petition for leave to appeal to oral argument, and from oral argument to decision – gives litigants a hint of what the Court’s decision is likely to be.  We showed that although there’s no consistent relationship between lag time … Continue Reading

Does the Time to Argument and Decision Correlate to How a Civil Case is Decided?

Last week, we reviewed the basic data on lag times at the Court – how long has it typically taken, year after year, for civil and criminal cases to be argued and decided.  This week, we’re looking at a different aspect of lag time – does it help predict the likely result?  Is a case … Continue Reading

How Long Do Criminal Cases Typically Take to Argument and Decision?

Last time, we reviewed the lag time data for the Court’s civil cases between 2005 and 2017 – specifically, (1) grant of petition for leave to appeal to oral argument; and (2) oral argument to decision.  This time, we’re looking at the Court’s experience with its criminal docket. Once again, we have only the argument-to-decision … Continue Reading

How Long Do Civil Cases Typically Take to Argument and Decision?

Last time, we were reviewing the Court’s treatment of cases with a dissent at the Appellate Court.  This week, we’re reviewing the data on lag times at the Court. In 2014, a joint project of the Court Management Committee of the Conference of Chief Justices and the Conference of State Court Administrators, in conjunction with … Continue Reading

Are Criminal Cases With a Dissent More Often Reversed?

Yesterday, we began our further examination of the Court’s experience with cases with a dissent at the Appellate Court.  We asked whether civil cases with a dissent were systematically more or less likely to be reversed than cases which were decided unanimously.  Today, we’re asking the same question on the criminal side of the docket. … Continue Reading

Are Civil Cases With a Dissent More Frequently Reversed?

Last week, we reviewed the data on whether cases which were published below are more frequently reversed.  This week, we’re reviewing a related issue: are cases with a dissent below more frequently reversed by the Supreme Court?  If so, that might suggest that dissents at the Appellate Court aren’t just helpful in getting the Court’s … Continue Reading

Are Published Criminal Cases More Often Reversed?

Yesterday, we tested whether publication at the Appellate Court has any impact on a civil case’s reversal rate at the Supreme Court.  The answer is no – published Appellate Court decisions on the civil side are not consistently reversed at a higher or lower rate than unpublished decisions.  Today, we test the same question on … Continue Reading

Are Published Civil Cases More Often Reversed?

Last week, we looked at the conventional wisdom which holds that the Supreme Court only reviews published decisions from the Appellate Court.  We showed that in fact, Rule 23 orders (the Illinois term for unpublished decisions) are not unheard of on the Court’s civil docket – in a typical year, twenty to forty percent of … Continue Reading

How Many of the Court’s Criminal Cases are Published at the Appellate Court?

Yesterday, we looked at how large a share of the Court’s civil docket since 1990 has been accounted for by cases which were published at the Appellate Court.  Although there have been spikes in both directions from time to time, we showed that typically, 60-80% of the court’s civil cases were published below.  Today, we’re … Continue Reading

How Many of the Court’s Civil Cases are Published at the Appellate Court?

Last time, we looked at the data on cases which had a dissenter at the Appellate Court, and whether they’re more likely to have at least one dissenter at the Supreme Court.  This week, we’re looking at a new question – how much of the court’s civil and criminal dockets consists of decisions which were … Continue Reading

Does Dissent at the Appellate Court Predict Division in Criminal Cases at the Supreme Court?

Yesterday, we looked at the year-by-year data on the civil side of the docket, asking whether a dissent at the Appellate Court tends to indicate that one or more dissenters are likely at the Supreme Court.  Today, we’re looking at the same question on the criminal side. In Table 676, we report the absolute numbers … Continue Reading

Does Dissent at the Appellate Court Predict Dissent in Civil Cases at the Supreme Court?

Last time, we tracked the year-by-year data, testing the proposition that most of the Court’s cases are sufficiently “close calls” to have brought a dissent at the Appellate Court.  This week, we’re testing another proposition – does dissent at the Appellate Court suggest that there’s going to be one or more dissenters at the Supreme … Continue Reading

Are Most of the Court’s Criminal Cases Divided Decisions at the Court of Appeal?

Last time, we looked at the share, year by year, of the Court’s civil docket accounted for by decisions which brought a dissent at the Court of Appeal.  Today, we’re looking at the data for the criminal docket. The Court decided fifteen criminal cases in 1990 and 1991 which were divided below.  The Court decided … Continue Reading

Are Most of the Court’s Civil Cases Divided Decisions at the Court of Appeal?

This week, we’re beginning a new topic in our ongoing study of the Court’s decision making.  One often hears that unless there’s a dissent at the Appellate Court level, there’s no chance that the Supreme Court will agree to hear the case.  So – how true is that?  How much of the Supreme Court’s docket … Continue Reading

Which Counties Produced the Court’s Criminal Docket, 1990-2017?

Yesterday, we reviewed the overall data for the period 1990 through 2017 of the originating counties for the Supreme Court’s civil docket.  Today, we’re looking at the Court’s criminal docket. Cook County accounted for 41.46% of the Court’s criminal docket between 1990 and 2017 – a slightly less predominant position than in the civil docket.  … Continue Reading

Which Counties Produced the Court’s Civil Docket, 1990-2017?

Over the past several weeks, we’ve been tracking the county trial courts which have produced the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal dockets between 1990 and 2017.  This week, we’re reviewing the overall data for the entire period. Between 1990 and 2017, Cook County accounted for 44.68% of the Court’s civil cases.  Du Page County produced … Continue Reading

Which Trial Courts Produce the Court’s Criminal Docket (Part 6)?

Yesterday, we examined the trial courts which produced the Supreme Court’s civil docket for the years 2015 through 2017.  Today, we’re looking at the data for the Court’s criminal docket. In 2015, the Court decided sixteen criminal cases from Cook County, four from Will and three from Kane County.  The Court decided one case each … Continue Reading

Which Trial Courts Produce the Court’s Civil Docket (Part 6)?

For the past several weeks, we’ve been reviewing the year-by-year data to determine which trial courts have produced the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal dockets.  This week, we’re reviewing the years 2015 through 2017.  Today: the civil docket. In 2015, the Court decided seventeen civil cases from Cook County.  The Court decided four cases from … Continue Reading

Which Trial Courts Produce the Court’s Criminal Docket (Part 5)?

Yesterday, we reviewed the trial courts from which the Court’s civil docket came for the years 2010 through 2014.  Today, we’re looking at the criminal docket. In 2010, the Court decided twenty-three cases from Cook County, six from  Peoria, four from Du Page, three from Kane County, and two each from Lake, Winnebago and Boone … Continue Reading

Which Trial Courts Produce the Court’s Civil Docket (Part 5)?

For the past several weeks, we’ve been reviewing, one year at a time, the trial courts which have produced the Supreme Court’s civil and criminal dockets.  This week, we’re reviewing the years 2010 through 2014. In 2010, the Court decided twenty-two civil cases from Cook County, two cases from Sangamon and Kane counties, and one … Continue Reading
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