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How Have Defendants Fared in Employment Law Cases at the Court Since 1990 (Part 3)?

Last time, we reviewed the data on the Court’s employment law cases from 2000 to 2010 and began looking at the data for the past nine years.  Today, we review the remainder of the data, as well as looking at the overall numbers. Since employment law cases have been so rare since 2010, we combine … Continue Reading

How Have Defendants Fared in Employment Law Cases at the Court Since 1990 (Part 2)?

Last time, we began our review of the Court’s recent history with employment law cases, covering the years 1990 through 1999.  Today, our review continues with the years 2000 through 2009. The Court’s employment law docket tailed off during our second ten years, from nineteen cases between 1990 and 1999 to fourteen in the period … Continue Reading

How Has the Court Handled Employment Law Cases Since 1990 (Part 1)?

For the past several weeks, we’ve been analyzing areas of law, looking at the data regarding what kinds of cases the court takes and what the individual Justices’ voting records on the issue are.  Today, we begin a new one: employment law. Between 1990 and 1999, the Court decided only nineteen employment law cases: four … Continue Reading

How Have Tort Defendants Fared at the Supreme Court Since 1990 (Part 3)?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been tracing the Supreme Court’s record and the Justices’ voting patterns with respect to tort cases.  Today, we’re finishing up with a review of the years 2010 to 2018. In Table 1091 below, we review the performance of tort defendants who prevailed at the Appellate Court.  Since 2010, such … Continue Reading

How Have Tort Defendants Fared at the Supreme Court Since 1990 (Part 2)?

Yesterday, we began our review of the data regarding the Court’s handling of tort cases.  Today, we’re continuing that series. In Table 1082, we divide the Court’s tort cases each year according to who won at the Appellate Court – the plaintiff or defendant?  Although review of plaintiffs’ wins dropped off in 2004 and 2005, … Continue Reading

Reviewing the Justices’ Voting Records in Insurance Law Cases, 1990-2018

Yesterday, we looked at the data for the number and type of insurance law cases the Court has decided, year-by-year, since 1990, as well as the insurers’ winning percentage in those cases.  Today, we’re reviewing the individual Justices’ voting records in insurance law cases. In Table 1065, we show yearly votes for insurer parties for … Continue Reading

Reviewing the Justices’ Agreement Rates in Criminal Cases, 2014-2018

Today, we’re finishing our review of the agreement rates for the Justices between 2014 and 2018.  If you get the impression reading the data below that the agreement rates for criminal cases below are consistently lower than the agreement rates on the civil side during the same years reviewed here, you’re right.  I calculated an … Continue Reading

Reviewing the Justices’ Agreement Rates in Criminal Cases, 2008-2013

For the past few weeks, we’ve been looking at the data for the Justices’ agreement rates in non-unanimous cases – in other words, how often did each possible combination of the seven Justices vote the same way in a case which had at least one dissenter.  Today, we’re looking at criminal cases between 2008 and … Continue Reading

Reviewing the Justices’ Agreement Rates in Criminal Cases, 2002-2007

Last time, we reviewed the Justices’ agreement rates in divided criminal decisions between 1996 and 2001.  In this post, we’re looking at the data for the years 2002 to 2007. Because Justice Burke only joined the Court in 2006, her agreement rates vary widely among her colleagues – Justice Freeman 100%, Justices Fitzgerald, Garman and … Continue Reading

Reviewing the Justices’ Agreement Rates in Criminal Cases, 1996-2001

Today, we’re continuing our look at the agreement rates for every possible combination of Justices in criminal cases by reviewing the data for the years 1996 to 2001. Justice Freeman’s highest agreement rate during these years was with Justice Fitzgerald, 86.96%.  Justice Rathje was next at 74.07%.  Three Justices were in the sixties – Bilandic … Continue Reading

Reviewing the Justices’ Agreement Rates in Criminal Cases, 1990-1995

Today, we start the second part of our ongoing analysis of agreement rates among the Justices since 1990 – the criminal docket.  We proceed just as we did with the civil docket, tracking agreement rates in non-unanimous cases.  “Disagreement” is defined as two Justices not voting exactly the same way with respect to the judgment … Continue Reading

Reviewing the Justices’ Agreement Rates in Civil Cases, 2014-2018

For the past two weeks, we’ve been reviewing the Justices’ agreement rates in divided civil cases across the period 1990 to 2018, working six years at a time.  Today, we’ve reached our fifth and last post on the civil docket, reviewing the years 2014 to 2018.  As we did last time, to facilitate comparisons for … Continue Reading

Reviewing the Justices’ Agreement Rates in Civil Cases, 2008-2013

Yesterday, we reviewed the Justices’ agreement rates in civil cases for the years 2002 through 2007.  Today, we’re looking at the agreement rates for the next six years – 2008 through 2013, with one change.  Since we’re now getting into a period where nearly all the current members of the Court had begun their tenures, … Continue Reading

Reviewing the Justices’ Agreement Rates in Civil Cases, 2002-2007

Last week, we began our review, six years at a time, of the Justices’ agreement rates in civil cases.  First, we addressed the years 1990 through 1995, and then, we looked at the years 1996 through 2001.  Today, we’re turning our attention to the civil agreement rates for the years 2002 to 2007. During these … Continue Reading

Reviewing the Justices’ Agreement Rates in Civil Cases, 1996-2001

Last time, we reviewed the Justices’ agreement rates – how often each possible combination of Justices, two at a time, voted together – in civil cases between 1990 and 1995.  In this post, we’re looking at the same number for the years 1996 to 2001. In Table 1007, we report the data for our first … Continue Reading

Reviewing the Justices’ Agreement Rates in Civil Cases, 1990-1995

For the past few weeks, we’ve been looking at how often each member of the Court since 1990 voted with the majority in divided decisions on both the civil and criminal side, looking both for how closely aligned each Justice was with the majority of the Court, and perhaps a rough indicator of each Justice’s … Continue Reading

Who Has Been the Bellwether Vote in Divided Criminal Cases (2004-2018)?

Last time, we began our review of the data on the criminal docket regarding how often each of the Justices voted with the majority in divided criminal cases between 1990 and 2003.  Today, we’re reviewing the years 2004 through 2018. In Table 1001, we review the most recent data for Justices Burke, Fitzgerald, Freeman, Garman, … Continue Reading

Who Has Been the Bellwether Vote in Divided Criminal Cases (1990-2003)?

Last week, we reviewed the data showing how often each Justice voted with the majority in a divided civil case.  This week, we’re looking at the criminal docket. In Table 997, we review the numbers for five Justices – Bilandic, Calvo, Clark, Cunningham and Fitzgerald.  Justice Bilandic was, for the most part, between sixty and … Continue Reading

Who Has Been the Bellwether Vote in Divided Civil Cases (2004-2018)?

Last time, we began our examination of a new question: who has most often been a bellwether vote – a Justice who is nearly always in the majority in a divided decision – in civil cases?  Then, we reviewed the years 1990-2003.  Now, we’re taking a look at the years 2004-2018. In Table 995, we … Continue Reading

Who Has Been the Bellwether Vote in Divided Civil Cases (1990-2003)?

On the vast majority of appellate courts, there are one or two Justices of whom appellate specialists say “they’re the votes you’ve got to have” – or alternatively, “lose those votes and you’re hurting.”  No matter the case, those Justices nearly always seem to be in the majority.  There can be at least a couple … Continue Reading

Who Wrote the Longest Majority Opinions in Criminal Cases Each Year Since 1990 (Part 2)?

Last time, we reviewed the data on the distribution of majority opinions in criminal cases from 1990 to 2018.  This time, we’re reviewing the lengths of each Justice’s majorities. In 1990, Justice Stamos led at 35.83 pages, and Justice Calvo averaged 31 pages.  Chief Justice Moran averaged 17.2 pages.  In 1991, Justice Cunningham averaged 46 … Continue Reading

Who Wrote the Longest Majority Opinions in Criminal Cases Each Year Since 1990 (Part 1)?

Over the past two weeks, we’ve reviewed the data on the distribution of the Court’s majority opinions in civil cases, and which Justice wrote the longest and shortest majorities each year.  Today, we’re reviewing the data in criminal cases. In our first table, we review the data for 1990 to 1996.  In 1990, Justice Stamos … Continue Reading

Who Wrote the Longest Majority Opinions in Civil Cases (Part 2)?

Yesterday, we began reviewing the Justice-by-Justice data for majority opinions in civil cases, beginning with the total number of majorities written each year.  Today, we’re looking at the average length of each Justice’s majority opinions in civil cases. In 1990, Justice Stamos averaged 25.8 pages per majority opinion, while Chief Justice Moran averaged 10.4 pages.  … Continue Reading
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