Archives: Oral Argument Question Patterns

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What Can We Infer From Chief Justice Karmeier’s Question Patterns in Criminal Cases?

Last week, we looked at what can be inferred from the patterns of Chief Justice Karmeier’s questions in civil cases between 2008 and 2016.  This week, we look at the Chief Justice’s questioning in criminal cases. In Table 497, we report the data for the Chief’s patterns when voting in the majority.  Like most appellate … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer When Chief Justice Karmeier Asks the First Question in Civil Cases?

Yesterday, we began our analysis of the Chief Justice’s question patterns in civil cases from 2008 through 2016.  Today, we address the Chief Justice’s patterns in criminal cases. When voting with the majority in an affirmance, the Chief Justice begins the questioning of appellants in 13.68% of cases.  There’s a 12.63% chance he’ll ask the … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer From Chief Justice Karmeier’s Question Patterns in Civil Cases?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been reviewing Justice Thomas’ question patterns in oral arguments since 2008, and whether it’s possible to infer his likely vote and whether he’s writing an opinion.  This week, we turn to Chief Justice Karmeier’s patterns in civil cases. Chief Justice Karmeier has voted with the majority in 95 cases … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer When Justice Thomas Asks the First Question in a Criminal Case?

Yesterday, we analyzed whether it’s possible to infer Justice Thomas’ vote and whether or not he’s writing an opinion based upon the pattern of his questions in criminal cases.  Today, we look at whether it’s more likely that Justice Thomas will ask the first question in criminal cases, based upon his vote and whether he’s … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer From Justice Thomas’ Question Patterns in Criminal Cases?

Last week, we analyzed the pattern of Justice Thomas’ questions in oral arguments in civil cases.  This week, we address Justice Thomas’ patterns in criminal cases. When Justice Thomas is in the majority, he questions the losing side more heavily than the party which will lose the case.  Justice Thomas has written the majority opinion … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer When Justice Thomas Asks the First Question in a Civil Case?

Yesterday, we analyzed whether we can infer Justice Thomas’ votes and whether or not he’s writing an opinion based upon the pattern of his questions at oral arguments in civil cases.  Today, we ask a different question – when Justice Thomas asks the first question in a civil case, does it mean he’s writing the … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer From Justice Thomas’ Question Patterns in Civil Cases?

Last week, we completed our two-week examination of Justice Kilbride’s patterns in oral arguments for civil and criminal cases between 2008 and 2016.  Today, we begin our examination of Justice Thomas’ patterns. In Table 485, we report the data on Justice Thomas’ question patterns when voting in the majority.  Both when the Court affirms and … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer When Justice Kilbride Asks the First Question in Criminal Cases?

Yesterday, we analyzed whether it’s possible, based on all oral arguments in criminal cases between 2009 and 2016, to infer from watching Justice Kilbride’s question patterns in criminal cases how he’s voting, and whether he’s writing an opinion.   Today, we ask the same question based on whether or not Justice Kilbride asks the first question. … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer From Justice Kilbride’s Question Patterns in Criminal Cases?

Last week, we analyzed the pattern of Justice Kilbride’s questions in oral arguments in civil cases, asking whether it’s possible to infer who Justice Kilbride will vote for and whether or not he’s writing an opinion.  This week, we do the same for the Court’s criminal cases between 2008 and 2016. Overall, Justice Kilbride has … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer When Justice Kilbride Asks the First Question in Civil Cases?

Yesterday, we asked whether we can infer anything about Justice Kilbride’s vote and whether he’s writing an opinion, based on the pattern of his questions in oral argument.  Today, we ask a slightly different question – can we infer anything from whether or not Justice Kilbride asks the first question in a civil case? Justice … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer From Justice Kilbride’s Question Patterns in Civil Cases?

Over the last two weeks, we’ve reviewed Justice Freeman’s question patterns in civil and criminal cases.  This week, we’ll be reviewing Justice Kilbride’s patterns with his questioning in civil cases. Justice Kilbride has heard oral argument in 127 cases where he voted with the majority in an affirmance.  He wrote the majority opinion in eight … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer When Justice Freeman Asks the First Question in a Criminal Case?

Yesterday, we showed that unlike many of his colleagues, Justice Freeman does not tend to ask the party he’s voting against more questions at oral argument – he averages more questions to the appellants in every scenario.  Today, we ask whether we can infer that Justice Freeman is writing an opinion in cases where he … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer From Justice Freeman’s Question Pattern in Criminal Cases?

Last week, we looked at the pattern of Justice Freeman’s questioning in oral arguments in civil cases, analyzing whether he tends to ask more questions of the party he will ultimately vote against, and what impact writing an opinion has on questioning.  This week, we take a look at Justice Freeman’s patterns in criminal cases. … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer When Justice Freeman Asks the First Question in a Civil Case?

Yesterday, we began analyzing Justice Freeman’s question patterns in civil cases.  Today, we analyze whether it is more likely that Justice Freeman will ask the first question, depending on his vote and whether he’s writing an opinion. Overall, when Justice Freeman is in the majority of an affirmance, there’s a 12.5% chance that Justice Freeman … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer From Justice Freeman’s Question Pattern in Civil Cases?

Last week, we analyzed Justice Garman’s question patterns in criminal cases.  This week, we address Justice Freeman’s question pattern in civil cases. We begin with cases in which Justice Freeman has voted with the majority.  When Justice Freeman votes with the majority, he more heavily questions the appellant by a wide margin.  Justice Freeman averages … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer When Justice Garman Asks the First Question in a Criminal Case?

Yesterday, we showed how Justice Garman’s vote and whether she is writing an opinion impacts her question patterns in criminal cases.  Today, we take the analysis the final step: what can we infer when Justice Garman asks the first question in a criminal case? When Justice Garman is in the majority of an affirmance, she … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer From Justice Garman’s Question Pattern in Criminal Cases?

Last week, we looked at the data from the past nine years’ oral arguments in civil cases, analyzing how Justice Garman’s vote, and whether or not she’s in the majority, impacts her question patterns.  We also looked at whether it’s reasonable to infer that Justice Garman might be writing an opinion in cases where she’s … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer When Justice Garman Asks the First Question in a Civil Case?

Yesterday, we showed that between 2008 and 2016, an unusually high level of questions from Justice Garman indicated that she was likely writing an opinion.  We also demonstrated that when Justice Garman was in the minority, she averaged more questions to the party she would vote against rather than the party which would ultimately lose. … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer From Justice Garman’s Question Pattern in Civil Cases?

Two weeks ago, we began our detailed analysis of the data on oral arguments in civil and criminal cases between 2008 and 2016.  This week and next, we’ll be looking at Justice Rita B. Garman’s patterns in oral argument, starting with civil cases. Our data includes 102 cases in which Justice Garman voted with a … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer When Justice Burke Asks the First Question in a Criminal Case?

Yesterday, we reviewed the data on Justice Burke’s question patterns in criminal cases. Today, we ask a related question: if Justice Burke asks the first question, can we infer that she is likely writing an opinion? Writing the majority opinion has some impact on the likelihood that Justice Burke will ask the first question. In … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer from Justice Burke’s Questioning Patterns in Criminal Cases (Part 1)?

Last week, we began our review of the individual Justices’ patterns in oral arguments, reviewing the data on Justice Anne M. Burke’s questioning in civil cases from 2008 to 2016. Today, we address Justice Burke’s patterns in criminal cases. We report the data for criminal cases when Justice Burke is in the majority in Table … Continue Reading

Is Justice Burke More Likely to Start the Questioning When She’s Writing an Opinion?

Yesterday, we analyzed the data from nine years’ worth of oral arguments in civil cases, looking at correlations between Justice Burke’s question patterns, her voting and whether she wrote an opinion in a given case.  Today, we address whether Justice Burke is statistically more likely to be writing an opinion in cases where she asks … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer From Justice Anne M. Burke’s Questioning Pattern in Civil Cases (Part 1)?

This week we’re turning our attention to multiple issues: (1) does each individual Justice ask more questions of the prevailing or losing party in civil cases; (2) is the Justice’s pattern different when he or she votes with the minority; (3) what difference does it make for each Justice’s questioning if the Justice is writing … Continue Reading

Does a More Active Bench Indicate That the Court Will Reverse in Criminal Cases?

Yesterday, we established that all things being equal, the Illinois Supreme Court has tended to ask somewhat more questions in civil cases where they reverse than in cases where they affirm.  Today, we address the Court’s criminal cases from 2008 to 2016. Our database consists of 160 affirmances in criminal cases and 188 reversals.  Once … Continue Reading
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