Archives: Data Analytics

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Tracking the Importance of Recusals in Criminal Cases (Part 2)

Yesterday, we began our review of the Court’s experience with recusals in criminal cases.  Today, we conclude our review with a look at the most recent years. First, let’s look at the importance of recusals in criminal cases for the years 2006 through 2011 – how often did recusals end up with the prevailing party … Continue Reading

Tracking the Importance of Recusals in Criminal Cases (Part 1)

Last week, we tracked the Court’s experience, year by year, with recusals in civil cases.  Recusals are potentially a serious issue in Illinois Supreme Court practice, since there’s no provision for replacing recused Justices with pro tem Justices, and there must be four votes for the Court to decide the case. This week, we turn … Continue Reading

Tracking the Importance of Recusals in Civil Cases (Part 1)

Last week, we reviewed the Court’s experience with certified questions from the Seventh Circuit.  This week, we begin our look at a different question: the Court’s history with recusals. Recusals are particularly important on the Illinois Supreme Court because unlike the other Court we follow, the California Supreme Court, there is no provision for replacing … Continue Reading

Are Certified Question Appeals More Likely to Be Decided by a Divided Court?

Yesterday, we looked at the small number of certified appeals the Court has decided since the late 1990s.  Since 1997, the Court has heard only eight certified question appeals from the Seventh Circuit – nearly all of them originating in the District Court for the Northern District of Illinois.  Today, we look at a related … Continue Reading

How Often Does the Illinois Supreme Court Hear Certified Questions from the Seventh Circuit?

Over the past couple of weeks over at the California Supreme Court Review, we’ve been analyzing the California Supreme Court’s experience with certified questions.  So today, we turn our attention to the same issue: how often does the Illinois Supreme Court decide certified questions? The Court’s certified question docket is governed by Supreme Court Rule … Continue Reading

What Could We Infer When Justice Theis Asked the First Question in Criminal Cases?

Yesterday, we reviewed Justice Theis’ question patterns in criminal cases between 2010 and 2016.  Today, we ask what it’s possible to infer when Justice Theis asked the first question in  criminal cases. Justice Theis voted with the majority in 84 criminal affirmances and 102 criminal reversals.  She wrote the majority opinion in fourteen of those … Continue Reading

What Could We Infer From Justice Theis’ Question Patterns in Criminal Cases?

Last week, we reviewed the data from Justice Theis’ participation in oral arguments in civil cases since she joined the Court in 2010.  This week, we turn our attention to Justice Theis’ record in criminal oral arguments. Justice Theis voted with the majority in 84 criminal affirmances and 102 criminal reversals.  She wrote the majority … Continue Reading

Post No. 999: What Could We Infer When Justice Theis Asked the First Question in Civil Cases?

Yesterday, we began our analysis of Justice Theis’ question patterns in civil cases.  Today, we continue our work on Justice Theis’ civil arguments since taking office in 2010. When voting in the majority of an affirmance, there’s a 32.88% chance that Justice Theis will ask the first question of appellants, but only a 15.07% chance … Continue Reading

Post No. 998: What Could We Infer From Justice Theis’ Question Patters in Civil Cases?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been reviewing the patterns in Chief Justice Fitzgerald’s questioning in civil and criminal cases between 2008 and his retirement in 2010.  This week, we review the question patterns of his successor, Justice Mary Jane Theis. Justice Theis voted with the majority in 73 civil affirmances and 105 civil reversals.  … Continue Reading

What Could We Infer When Chief Justice Fitzgerald Asked the First Question in Criminal Cases?

Yesterday, we reviewed the data for Chief Justice Fitzgerald’s question pattern in criminal cases between 2008 and 2010.  Today, we look at a different aspect of the data – was the Chief Justice more likely to ask the first question of either side, depending on how he was voting and whether he was writing an … Continue Reading

What Could We Infer From Chief Justice Fitzgerald’s Question Patterns in Criminal Cases?

Last week, we continued our analysis of the Court’s oral arguments between 2008 and 2016 with a look at former Chief Justice Fitzgerald’s patterns in civil cases during the two years before he retired, 2008-2010.  This week, we turn our attention to Chief Justice Fitzgerald’s patterns in criminal cases. In all, Chief Justice Fitzgerald voted … Continue Reading

What Could We Infer When Chief Justice Fitzgerald Asked the First Question in Civil Cases?

Yesterday, we began our review of the limited data from civil cases in which Chief Justice Fitzgerald both participated in oral argument and voted between 2008 and 2010.  Today, we wrap up our look at the civil docket. As we noted yesterday, the Chief Justice voted with the majority in 32 civil affirmances, writing the … Continue Reading

What Could We Infer From the Pattern of Chief Justice Fitzgerald’s Questions in Civil Cases?

Our review of the Court’s oral arguments between 2008 and 2016 continues this week with Chief Justice Thomas Fitzgerald.  Since Chief Justice Fitzgerald retired in 2010, our data is more limited than it is for other Justices.  Because we’re tracking correlations between questions and voting, we disregard the cases in 2010 for which the Chief … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer When Chief Justice Karmeier Asks the First Question in Criminal Cases?

Yesterday, we reviewed the data on Chief Justice Karmeier’s questions in civil cases between 2008 and 2016.  Today, we take a look at a different side of the data – what can we infer when the Chief Justice asks the first question to either side in criminal cases? Voting against a party did not make … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer From Chief Justice Karmeier’s Question Patterns in Criminal Cases?

Last week, we looked at what can be inferred from the patterns of Chief Justice Karmeier’s questions in civil cases between 2008 and 2016.  This week, we look at the Chief Justice’s questioning in criminal cases. In Table 497, we report the data for the Chief’s patterns when voting in the majority.  Like most appellate … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer When Chief Justice Karmeier Asks the First Question in Civil Cases?

Yesterday, we began our analysis of the Chief Justice’s question patterns in civil cases from 2008 through 2016.  Today, we address the Chief Justice’s patterns in criminal cases. When voting with the majority in an affirmance, the Chief Justice begins the questioning of appellants in 13.68% of cases.  There’s a 12.63% chance he’ll ask the … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer From Chief Justice Karmeier’s Question Patterns in Civil Cases?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been reviewing Justice Thomas’ question patterns in oral arguments since 2008, and whether it’s possible to infer his likely vote and whether he’s writing an opinion.  This week, we turn to Chief Justice Karmeier’s patterns in civil cases. Chief Justice Karmeier has voted with the majority in 95 cases … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer When Justice Thomas Asks the First Question in a Criminal Case?

Yesterday, we analyzed whether it’s possible to infer Justice Thomas’ vote and whether or not he’s writing an opinion based upon the pattern of his questions in criminal cases.  Today, we look at whether it’s more likely that Justice Thomas will ask the first question in criminal cases, based upon his vote and whether he’s … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer From Justice Thomas’ Question Patterns in Criminal Cases?

Last week, we analyzed the pattern of Justice Thomas’ questions in oral arguments in civil cases.  This week, we address Justice Thomas’ patterns in criminal cases. When Justice Thomas is in the majority, he questions the losing side more heavily than the party which will lose the case.  Justice Thomas has written the majority opinion … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer When Justice Thomas Asks the First Question in a Civil Case?

Yesterday, we analyzed whether we can infer Justice Thomas’ votes and whether or not he’s writing an opinion based upon the pattern of his questions at oral arguments in civil cases.  Today, we ask a different question – when Justice Thomas asks the first question in a civil case, does it mean he’s writing the … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer From Justice Thomas’ Question Patterns in Civil Cases?

Last week, we completed our two-week examination of Justice Kilbride’s patterns in oral arguments for civil and criminal cases between 2008 and 2016.  Today, we begin our examination of Justice Thomas’ patterns. In Table 485, we report the data on Justice Thomas’ question patterns when voting in the majority.  Both when the Court affirms and … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer When Justice Kilbride Asks the First Question in Criminal Cases?

Yesterday, we analyzed whether it’s possible, based on all oral arguments in criminal cases between 2009 and 2016, to infer from watching Justice Kilbride’s question patterns in criminal cases how he’s voting, and whether he’s writing an opinion.   Today, we ask the same question based on whether or not Justice Kilbride asks the first question. … Continue Reading

What Can We Infer From Justice Kilbride’s Question Patterns in Criminal Cases?

Last week, we analyzed the pattern of Justice Kilbride’s questions in oral arguments in civil cases, asking whether it’s possible to infer who Justice Kilbride will vote for and whether or not he’s writing an opinion.  This week, we do the same for the Court’s criminal cases between 2008 and 2016. Overall, Justice Kilbride has … Continue Reading
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